Project for Dhl on Customer Service Assignment

Project for Dhl on Customer Service Assignment Words: 9121

Now a days companies are identifying the need to create a loyal customer base and acknowledges that maintaining existing customers and extending business with them in significantly less expensive than acquiring new customers. Empirical proof of the proliferation of such customer loyalty efforts in the business world is e. g. provided in the form of loyalty programs, which many companies have installed during the past years. By engaging in efforts aimed at creating customer loyalty, which in turn fosters financial success in monetary terms firms react to increasing competitive challenges.

Within research, the investigation of customer loyalty gained importance when the classic marketing paradigm with its instrumental and transactional orientation proved unsuitable in the context of longer-term business relationships. Instead, the relationship marketing approach, which is specifically concerned with the study of relational ex-changes, gained importance within research, serving as a conceptual foundation for the majority of customer loyalty researchers.

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The question of how loyalty develops has been subject to an abundance of research, leading to an expansive body of literature on loyalty determinants. The extant literature exploring different factors and their constituent effects on loyalty, however, reveals a strong focus on consumer goods and industrial equipment settings, while industrial services have received relatively little attention so far. In addition, the majority of articles incorporates merely a few potential determinants and thus fails to draw a comprehensive picture of the mechanisms of customer loyalty formation.

Just like other businesses, logistics service providers (LSPs) are faced with increasing competitive pressure that urges them to concentrate not only on operational business processes, but also on an efficient and effective customer management. In the US alone, LSPs? revenues grew from US-$ 3 31 billion in 1995 to US-$ 85 billion in 2004 and logistics outsourcing expenditures as a fraction of total logistics expenditures are at over 40% and expected to rise even further. One way to meet this challenge of rapid growth and expansion, according to Langley et al. s to focus on establishing, maintaining, and developing relationships with customers. An often proposed driver of logistics outsourcing is the need to develop and maintain competitive advantage, which customers of LSPs intend to achieve through concentrating on core competencies and re-engineering. Another important driver is the ongoing globalization, which several authors regard as the most important challenge that companies are facing. In this context, LSPs can play an important role as facilitators of global trade.

Along with globalization, however, companies that outsource logistics activities increasingly try to consolidate the number of LSPs they use globally. Therefore, LSPs do not only have to devise sustain-able growth strategies, but also have to develop intercultural management competencies, a challenge hardly ad-dressed in LSP management literature. While intercultural management deals with the influence of culture on management styles in different countries, it is also arguable whether a one best way management paradigm is applicable even within national confines.

LSPs? customers are extremely diverse and similarly, relationships between LSPs and their customers can be expected to exhibit momentous differences. As such, it is a crucial management issue for LSPs to de-sign their customer loyalty efforts in a manner that accounts for both cultural context and different relationship characteristics. RESEARCH GOALS As outlined in the preceding section, LSPs are confronted with diverse management challenges that result from continuous growth, globalization, and customer diversity.

The aim of the present study therefore is to identify determinants of customer loyalty in relationships between LSPs 4 and their customers by explicitly considering different characteristics and cultural contexts of such relationships. In this sense, the present research is positioned at the interface of marketing and logistics and is intended to contribute not only to logistics research, but also to research in marketing, customer loyalty, and cultural studies. In order to address the concept of customer loyalty, it is important to understand the mechanisms underlying loyalty in the logistics outsourcing context.

For this reason, the starting point of the present research will be the study of Wallen burg, who studied customer loyalty within relationships between LSPs and their customers. On this basis, factors that can be surmised to determine customer loyalty in such relationships will be proposed and interdependencies between these factors will be identified. The resulting comprehensive explanatory model of customer loyalty will not only provide insights into the constitution of customer loyalty, but will also serve as the basis for subsequent analyses.

As stated previously, a globalizing marketplace and the need of LSPs to render logistics services on an international scale requires intercultural management competencies. Before being able to apply such management techniques, though, a thorough understanding of cultural differences between different countries is necessary. The present study will therefore provide a starting point for such analyses by investigating cultural differences between two important markets for logistics outsourcing, the USA and Germany.

Particular differences between Germany and the USA will be identified and applied to the previously devised customer loyalty model. As a result, differences between the two countries with respect to the formation of customer loyalty can be inferred. Finally, this study will investigate in how far different relationship conditions influence the development of customer loyalty. For this purpose, important relationship characteristics will be identified and their moderating influences on the customer loyalty model will be examined.

This will provide information on the robustness of the customer loyalty model versus relational contingencies and will suggest if it is necessary to differentiate customer loyalty efforts accordingly. Customer Satisfaction 5 The term logistics is often misinterpreted to mean transportation. In fact, the scope of logistics goes well beyond transportation. Logistics forms the system that ensures the delivery of the product in the entire supply pipeline. This includes transportation, packaging, storage and handling methods, and information flow.

The impact of logistics in the ability of a company to satisfy its customers cannot be overstated. All other efforts at modernization within a company would not bear fruit until the logistics system is carefully designed to facilitate the smooth and efficient flow of goods in the system. The topic of logistics is relatively new in India. There have been some companies that have done work in this area, but a large number of companies are only now beginning to realize the benefits of designing and managing the entire supply chain. With India joining the global marketplace, the role of logistics assumes greater importance.

The industrial policies in India have prompted manufacturers to build plants in remote, backward areas due to inexpensive land and tax benefits. This poses some serious logistical problems. Apart from a poor road and transportation network, the existing communications system in India leaves a lot to be desired by any international standard. It is in this context that logistics has to be considered in India. 7 Steps in Customer Satisfaction 1. Encourage Face-to-Face Dealings This is the most daunting and downright scary part of interacting with a customer. If you’re not used to this sort of thing it can be a pretty nervewracking experience.

Rest assured, though, it does get easier over time. 6 It’s important to meet your customers face to face at least once or even twice during the course of a project. 2. Respond to Messages Promptly & Keep Your Clients Informed This goes without saying really. We all know how annoying it is to wait days for a response to an email or phone call. It might not always be practical to deal with all customers’ queries within the space of a few hours, but at least email or call them back and let them know you’ve received their message and you’ll contact them about it as soon as possible.

Even if you’re not able to solve a problem right away, let the customer know you’re working on it. 3. Be Friendly and Approachable A fellow Site Pointer once told me that you can hear a smile through the phone. This is very true. It’s very important to be friendly, courteous and to make your clients feel like you’re their friend and you’re there to help them out. There will be times when you want to beat your clients over the head repeatedly with a blunt object – it happens to all of us. It’s vital that you keep a clear head, respond to your clients’ wishes as best you can, and at all times remain polite and courteous. . Have a Clearly-Defined Customer Service Policy This may not be too important when you’re just starting out, but a clearly defined customer service policy is going to save you a lot of time and effort in the long run. If a customer has a problem, what should they do? If the first option doesn’t work, then what? Should they contact different people for billing and technical enquiries? If they’re not satisfied with any aspect of your customer service, who should they tell? There’s nothing more annoying for a client than being passed from person to person, or not knowing who to turn to.

Making sure they know exactly what to do at each stage of their enquiry should be of utmost importance. So make sure your customer service policy is present on your site — and anywhere else it may be useful. 7 5. Attention to Detail (also known as ‘The Little Niceties’) Have you ever received a Happy Birthday email or card from a company you were a client of? Have you ever had a personalized sign-up confirmation email for a service that you could tell was typed from scratch? These little niceties can be time consuming and aren’t always cost effective, but remember to do them.

Even if it’s as small as sending a Happy Holidays email to all your customers, it’s something. It shows you care; it shows there are real people on the other end of that screen or telephone; and most importantly, it makes the customer feel welcomed, wanted and valued. 6. Anticipate Your Client’s Needs & Go Out Of Your Way to Help Them Out Sometimes this is easier said than done! However, achieving this supreme level of understanding with your clients will do wonders for your working relationship. 7. Honor Your Promises It’s possible this is the most important point in this article.

The simple message: when you promise something, deliver. Clients don’t like to be disappointed. Sometimes, something may not get done, or you might miss a deadline through no fault of your own. Projects can be late, technology can fail and sub-contractors don’t always deliver on time. In this case a quick apology and assurance it’ll be ready ASAP wouldn’t go a miss. 8 Customer Delight Since the beginning of the 1990s, customer delight has gained importance both in relationship marketing research and in business. In business, this can be attributed to changing market- and competition-environments.

Due to a shift from a sellers? to a buyers? market and because of an increasing degree of globalization, most industries find themselves confronted with new challenges. In a first phase, firms tried to face these challenges by focusing on their internal processes and organizational structures, trying to achieve cost reductions by concentrating on internal improvements. A second phase of external focus followed, where firms directed attention to their customers, trying to retain existing ones and to win over new ones (churning). Since “acquiring new customers is much more expensive than keeping them”.

And “loyal customers are the bedrock of any business”. A delighted customer base represents a barrier to entry, a basis for a price premium, time to respond to competitor innovations, and a bulwark against deleterious price competition. Loyalty is critical to brand volume, is highly correlated to market share, and can be used as the basis of predicting future market share; consequently, understanding loyalty appears critical to any meaningful analysis of marketing strategy. Obtaining a thorough understanding of customer delight is a prerequisite for the execution of the research at hand.

For that, the development of customer delight research within the framework of relationship marketing will be presented first, before different customer delight concepts will be introduced. From these concepts, a definition of customer delight for use in this study will be derived, before both consequences and antecedents of customer delight will be portrayed. In marketing research, two trends mark the development of customer loyalty. While individual transactions initially were in the center of marketing research, the focus shifted towards analyzing relationships states that the „traditional? arketing concept of the marketing mix with its „4 Ps? , developed in the middle of the last century, had been the established approach until the 1990s. This approach, how-ever, focuses solely on transactions, a deficit tackled by the relationship marketing approach. At the core of it is the study of relationships between buyers and sellers of goods or services, in contrast to merely examining 9 transactions. An often cited and comprehensive definition of relationship marketing is provided “Relationship marketing refers to all marketing activities directed toward establishing, developing, and maintaining successful relational exchanges. Therefore, the relationship marketing approach pro-vides a suitable environment in which customer loyalty research can be nested. While the development of relationship marketing began in the early 1970s, it was not until the late 1980s that works from the „Nordic School of Services?. Initiated a paradigm shift that geared marketing towards the creation, Although conservation, relationship and extension today of is buyer-seller widely relationships. among marketing accepted marketing researchers, its promoters do not postulate there placement of the transactional approach, but rather juxtapose the two approaches.

For example, delineates a strategy continuum, in which different goods require different degrees of transactionand relationship-based marketing strategies. As a result of the focus on relationships in marketing research, customer loyalty gained importance within research. Before determining which stream the present study can be associated with, however, it is important to create a clear understanding of different customer loyalty concepts prevalent in research. This will be accomplished in the following section. The Concepts Customer Delight

Customer delight deals with relationships between suppliers and their customers and can be distinguished from other delight aspects, such as brand loyalty, which refer to a more abstract attachment, such as that towards a brand. Within German customer delight literature, the notion of customer delight is even more faceted, encompasses both „customer 10 delight? and „customer retention? distinguishes an active, supplier-focused component and a passive, customer focused component of customer delight. In the supplier-focused perspective, customer delight is seen as a bundle of measures that aim at improving relationships with customers.

The supplier is in the center of attention and the customer is only regarded as the factor at which success of customer delight becomes manifest. Here it becomes clear that this approach contains a conceptual deficit. It is the customer who eventually decides on whether customer loyalty management is successful or not, because all activities undertaken by a supplier can only be geared at influencing customers to be loyal. A customer-focused perspective therefore has to be added to evaluate the success of customer delight management.

Within the customer-focused perspective, customer delight is conceptualized taking into account customers? complex characteristics. These can either be approached as customers? directly observable actions and/or take into account their attitudes and intentions. Since customers? actions are directly influenced by their attitudes and intentions, it is obvious that these have to be scrutinized to understand and manage delight. A third perspective is a synthesis of the former two approaches. The relationship-focused perspective directly examines the relationship between suppliers and customers.

Accordingly, the objects of study in this perspective usually are buying behavior in retail contexts and long-term relationships marked by frequent interaction between suppliers and buyers in industrial contexts. It is clear that the supplier-focused perspective with its instrumental approach is significantly different from the other two approaches. Distinguishing the customer- and the relationship-focused perspective, however, is difficult, because both focus on the customer. The concepts Behaviorist customer loyalty The concepts of Behaviorist customer loyalty have been at the core of early marketing research and focus on customers? bservable behavior, as 11 e. g. in purchasing behavior. Accordingly, customer loyalty is established, when customers demonstrate consistency in their choice of supplier or brand. “Hard-core” loyalty, when one product alternative is exclusively repurchased and of “reinforcing” loyalty, when customers switch among brands but repeat-purchase one or more alternatives to a significant extent. Similarly, customer loyalty as “the proportion of times a purchaser chooses the same product or service in a specific category compared to the total number of purchases made by the purchaser in that category”.

Pegging customer loyalty to purchasing behavior, however, is very critical; there can be a multitude of factors affecting purchasing behavior, such as product availability or special deals, which are not grasped by looking at purchases alone. A main deficit of the behaviorist approach thus is that it does not look at the drivers? behind purchasing behavior. Another disadvantage of behaviorist customer loyalty concepts is their ex-post approach. When loyalty is only expressed through purchases, information on customers? actual loyalty status in between purchases is not available.

Consequently, decreasing loyalty is only recognized after it manifests itself through changed purchasing behavior. Only in relationships with frequent interaction can a supplier integrate further aspects, such as complaints, into customer loyalty management. The reason, why behaviorist concepts may still be valuable, is because the measurement of customer loyalty in this approach does not necessitate involvement by the customer. The assessment of attitudes and intentions would always imply customers? cooperation through participation in surveys.

By simply recording purchases, e. g. through delivery records in the industrial context or customer cards in a consumer context; the assessment of customer loyalty poses little difficulty. Particularly in areas, where most purchases can be easily ascribed to individual customers, as is the case with mail-ordering or book-stores on the internet, the behaviorist approach is useful for identifying different customer groups and their characteristics. Such firms, however, can only assess purchases of their own products, while purchases of competing products go unnoticed.

Firms can therefore neither draw conclusions about relative changes of purchasing behaviors, nor evaluate their comparative market position. 12 The loyalty concepts Neo-behaviorist customer Neo- behaviorist customer loyalty concepts start at the shortcomings of the behaviorist approach by examining the causes of loyalty. As early as 1969, Day concluded that “loyalty should be evaluated with both attitudinal and behavioral criteria” otherwise accidental repeat-purchases, merely resulting from situational exigencies, would be regarded as indicators of loyalty.

There is no agreement, however, on the question, whether attitudes are part of customer loyalty or merely an antecedent of it. Some authors propose that only positive attitude can lead to „true? customer loyalty. If attitude then is a necessary prerequisite of customer loyalty, some drivers of loyalty cannot be explained. Transaction cost theory, for instance, provides the concept of asset specificity. Relationshipspecific investments create economic switching barriers and therefore increase customer loyalty.

However, the mere repeat purchase of goods or services for reasons of economic constraints would not qualify as loyalty, as positive attitudes are not involved. In order to avoid the outlined problem, it is useful to abstain from defining positive attitude to be a necessary antecedent of loyalty. Instead, researchers usually consider intentions and observable behavior to be the constituting elements of customer loyalty. The Determinants of Customer Loyalty The marketing activities towards the creation of customer loyalty, its determinants and their precise effects ave to be known. Accordingly, many researchers have investigated this topic. In order to gain an overview of the determinants identified in these works, they can be structured in three dimensions: (1) Company-related determinants refer to the supplier itself or to the goods or services offered. It is a prerequisite for the existence of customer loyalty that the offered goods or services create utility for the customer and that they are available. In this respect, an assessment is usually performed by examining 13 quality.

In order to evaluate the price-performance ratio, customers will pay attention to prices. Customer loyalty will also be influenced by the reputation a company has and ultimately by customer loyalty programs offered. (2) Relationship-related determinants play a significant role in long-term the relationships. Factors regarding the interaction between suppliers and customers, such as relationship quality, previous experiences, and trust are important. Commitment, which provides evidence of emotional closeness and moral or normative feelings of obligation, takes a central role in relationships.

Specificity and dependence can lead to economic, psychological and social switching barriers. (3) Customer-related determinants are mainly influenced by customers? characteristics. In this respect, affect and involvement, and consequently also the importance of the good or service to the customer, are important. In addition to the above delineated areas, the effects of the market environment and competition are researched, as is the link between satisfaction and loyalty, which plays an important role in the research of customer loyalty and is often placed in one of the three dimensions.

However, as most other determinants influence satisfaction, it cannot be clearly separated and should therefore be listed as a distinct category. 14 SCOPE OF THE STUDY The Scope of the Study is restricted by my learning over there. This study is based on only one DHL Warehouse. This study reveals the service management of DHL and their smoothness. It also discusses the different processes that can dissatisfy the customers. This study also discusses about the customer feedback which leads the customer satisfaction. Hence, this study discusses about the service improvement and customer satisfaction which at last delighted the customers.

Here the requirement of this study is a warehouse having different processes as Inbound, Outbound, Replenishment, Central Distribution, Loading, etc. activities so that data can be collected from that. 15 SIGNIFICANCE OF THE STUDY The learning is all about understanding of the whole process related to the warehouse in precise manner and details about product relocation and resource modeling. With the support of the management in DHL as well as the employees of HUL we could get clarity on how serious even a minute work is at a work place and how active we should be all the time.

It was a great experience working with this company and we could learn the inventory management and also the importance of marketing with it (customer satisfaction). I thank my faculty guide for his intense support and help whenever I required in the completion of my project. 16 OBJECTIVES OF THE STUDY ? To know the current customer satisfaction level To know the loyalty of the customer towards the company To find out the loopholes of that dissatisfies the customer To give suggestion regarding improvement of performance standard of the company ? ? ? ? To inform the management about current level 7 CHAPTER – 2 18 INDUSTRY PROFILE Supply Chain Management is the systemic, strategic coordination of the traditional business functions and the tactics across these business functions within a particular company and across businesses within the supply chain, for the purposes of improving the long-term performance of the individual companies and the supply chain as a whole Supply chain management (SCM) is the management of a network of interconnected businesses involved in the ultimate provision of product and service packages required by end customers.

Supply Chain Management spans all movement and storage of raw materials, work-in-process inventory, and finished goods from point of origin to point of consumption. SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT PROBLEMS Distribution Network Configuration: number, location and network missions of suppliers, production facilities, distribution centers, warehouses, cross-docks and customers. Distribution Strategy: questions of operating control (centralized, decentralized or shared); delivery scheme, e. g. , direct shipment, pool point shipping, cross docking, DSD (direct store delivery), closed loop shipping; mode of transportation, e. . , motor carrier, including truckload, LTL, parcel; railroad; intermodal transport, including TOFC (trailer on flatcar) and COFC (container on flatcar); ocean freight; airfreight; replenishment strategy (e. g. , pull, push or hybrid); and transportation control (e. g. , owner-operated, private carrier, common carrier, contract carrier, or 3PL). Trade-Offs in Logistical Activities: The above activities must be well coordinated in order to achieve the lowest total logistics cost. Trade-offs may increase the total cost if only one of the activities is optimized.

For example, full truckload (FTL) rates are more economical on a cost per pallet basis than less than truckload (LTL) shipments. If, however, a full truckload of a product is ordered to reduce transportation costs, there will be an increase in inventory holding costs which may increase total logistics costs. It is therefore imperative to take a systems 19 approach when planning logistical activities. These trade-offs are key to developing the most efficient and effective Logistics and SCM strategy.

Information: Integration of processes through the supply chain to share valuable information, including demand signals, forecasts, inventory, transportation, potential collaboration, etc. Inventory Management: Quantity and location of inventory, including raw materials, workin-progress (WIP) and finished goods. Cash-Flow: Arranging the payment terms and methodologies for exchanging funds across entities within the supply chain. Supply chain execution means managing and coordinating the movement of materials, information and funds across the supply chain. The flow is bi-directional

ACTIVITIES/FUNCTIONS Supply chain management is a cross-function approach including managing the movement of raw materials into an organization, certain aspects of the internal processing of materials into finished goods, and the movement of finished goods out of the organization and toward the end-consumer. As organizations strive to focus on core competencies and becoming more flexible, they reduce their ownership of raw materials sources and distribution channels. These functions are increasingly being outsourced to other entities that can perform the activities better or more cost effectively.

The effect is to increase the number of organizations involved in satisfying customer demand, while reducing management control of daily logistics operations. Less control and more supply chain partners led to the creation of supply chain management concepts. The purpose of supply chain management is to improve trust and collaboration among supply chain partners, thus improving inventory visibility and the velocity of inventory movement. Several models have been proposed for understanding the activities required to manage material movements across organizational and functional boundaries.

SCOR is a supply chain management model promoted by the Supply Chain Council. Another model is the SCM Model proposed by the Global Supply Chain Forum (GSCF). Supply chain activities can be grouped into strategic, tactical, and operational levels. The CSCMP has adopted The American Productivity & Quality Center (APQC) Process Classification Framework SM a high-level, industry-neutral enterprise process model that allows organizations to see their business processes from a cross-industry viewpoint. 20 COMPANY PROFILE

DHL Express is a division of Deutsche Post providing international express mail services. Originally founded in 1969 to deliver documents between San Francisco and Honolulu, the company expanded its service throughout the world by the late 1970s. The company was primarily interested in offshore and inter-continental deliveries, but the success of FedEx prompted their own inter-US expansion starting in 1983. DHL aggressively expanded to countries that could not be served by any other delivery service, including the Eastern Bloc, Vietnam and the People’s Republic of China.

In 1998, Deutsche Post began to acquire shares in DHL, finally reached majority ownership in 2001, and completed the purchase in 2002. Deutsche Post then effectively absorbed DHL into its Express division while expanding the use of the DHL brand to other Deutsche Post divisions, business units and subsidiaries. Today, DHL Express shares its well-known DHL brand with other Deutsche Post business units such as DHL Global Forwarding & Freight and DHL Supply Chain. Company Type Industry Founded Headquarters Key people : : : : :

Division Express Logistics 1969 Bonn, Germany Frank Appel (CEO, Chairman) Adrian Dalsey (co-founder) Larry Hillblom (co-founder)Robert Lynn (co-founder) Products 12:00 Owner(s) Employees : DHL Express Worldwide DHL Express 9:00 DHL Express : : Deutsche Post DHL 500,000 (2009) 21 Logistics market is all set to experience a period of explosive organic growth, judging by independent market analyst Data monitor’s latest research. The Data monitor report, “India Logistics Outlook 2007,” predicts high double-digit growth rates for both outsourced and contract logistics in India.

With India’s gross domestic profit (GDP) growing at over 9% per year and the manufacturing sector enjoying double digit growth rates, the Indian logistics industry is at an inflection point, and is expected to reach a market size of over $125 billion in year 2010. Strong growth enablers exist in India today in the form of over $300 billion worth of infrastructure investments, phased introduction of value-added-tax (VAT), and development of organized retail and agri-processing industries.

In addition, strong foreign direct investment inflows (FDI) in automotive, capital goods, electronics, retail, and telecom will lead to increased market opportunities for providers of 3PL in India. ” However, as a result of the under-developed trade and logistics infrastructure, the logistics cost of the Indian economy is over 13% of GDP, compared to less than10% of GDP in almost the entire Western Europe and North America. As leading manufacturers realign their global portfolios of manufacturing locations, India will have to work on such systemic inefficiencies, in order to attract and retain long-term real investments. PL/outsourced logistics is the outsourcing of a company’s logistics operations to a specialized firm, which provides multiple tactical logistics services for use by customers as opposed to the respective company having a business unit in-house to oversee its supply chain and transportation of goods. SOME FACTS Market Size US $ 1. 5 Billion Growth rate between 15 to 20% per annum International gateways: Mumbai Delhi, Chennai Domestic gateways Mumbai Delhi Kolkata 22 Chennai Pune Gauwhati Bangalore Salem Ahmedabad Hyderabad Ambala Nagpur Employees over 1. Million people Air express witnessed maximum growth in the air cargo market In 2007 over 1. 70 Billion shipments handled Air traffic grows faster than anywhere in the world Total cargo traffic increased by 21. 5 % in 2006-07 126 airport 14 int’l airport account for 96 % of total freight traffic Estimated market size US$ 1. 5 Billion High growth rate Express market expected to grow more than 20 % India’s Express industry bigger than tea and entertainment industry 2nd fastest growing major economy Major competitors of DHL include: Fed Ex. United States Postal Service UPS. TNT Royal Mail. 23

CHAPTER-3 24 RESEARCH METHODOLOGY Introduction The research design adopted in this study from primary and secondary data is exploratory and analytical in nature. Exploratory research aims to gain familiarity and new insights into any phenomenon while analytical research aims at analyzing the current scenario and thereby using that to project the future performance. This research aims at studying the historical performance of the warehouse in terms of its efficiency to deliver the best to its existing customer’s error free service and it also evaluates the future prospects of the warehouse.

The data is collected from various resources as observation, by asking question. Here we need to study the entire system first to analyze the processes and finding the loopholes that may cause the dissatisfaction of the customer. Some important processes are such as Inbound, Outbound, Central distribution, Picking etc. will be observe so that to find the error prone area. Sample Profile There are mainly three types of customers in the DHL these are Navaratri Customer, Modern Trade Customer, and Upcountry customer.

There are 9 Navaratri Customer that gives the 60% of the business to the DHL, 9 Modern trade Customers and more than 75 Upcountry Customers. So our sample is 9 for Navaratri customer, 9 for Modern Trade Customers and 75 for Upcountry Customers. Hence total 109 customers. 25 TOOLS AND METHODS OF DATA COLLECTION For Secondary Data:1. Collection of the Existing data record about the customers and their details 2. Collection of the Different complaint such as a. Product Shortage b. Product mismatch c. Damaged product d. Excess received product e. Earlier report of improvement steps if any

For Primary Data:1. By observation of the different processes that may leads to the above mentioned problems These processes are: a. Order processing b. Wave generation c. Shipment generation d. Picking e. Central Distribution f. Loading etc. 2. By visiting the customer and asking about the problem and ask to fill up the questionnaire. 26 DIFFERENT PROCESSES OF WAREHOUSE There are various processes happen in the operation of Management of Goods. Following are the various processes:1. Inbound: – This is the process which includes receiving the goods and keeping inside the warehouse.

There are several sub processes are also included which are performed during the completion of Inbound. Following are the Sub processes which are performed:A. Reporting of the Truck: – First the loaded truck will come to the warehouse and report to the gatekeeper. The truck driver submits the document which is bill of goods purchase. The gatekeeper enters the detail of truck and details of bill of purchase in register. Then gatekeeper enters the required record into the system and report to the internal officer in the warehouse.

After getting confirmation truck driver has to wait before further call from the warehouse. B. Confirmation from warehouse:- Once the docks in charge gets information about the docks availability he confirms the gatekeeper to allow truck to enter in the warehouse premises. Same time docks in charge also assign dock number at which unloading of truck has to be done. Then truck enters into the warehouse premises and stand on the respective dock door. C. Unloading: – once the truck stands on the dock door dock in charge assigns unloading supervisor and toil of labor to unload the truck.

The worker unloads the truck under the inspection of supervisor. D. Palleting : – After unloading the worker has to stack the cartoons on the pellet. Then they wrap the pallet by which any cartoon will not be disarranged. This process is called palletisation. E. Counting and Rechecking: – After completion of unloading truck has to wait on dock door till further instruction. Then Unloading In charge assigns the supervisor to count and recheck the goods for any shortages or damages. If any shortages or damages happen the supervisor has to make note on bill of purchase and report to in charge.

F. WMS updating or GR creation: – If any shortages happen the System people have to enter in the system and update the information because it is fully system operated warehouse. If no error is there then the WMS people has to enter the all information from Bill of purchase in the system in order to update the system. G. Labeling: – Once the updating activity is completed the WMS people have to generate the label. Label contains three things that are location of particular rack at which pallet has to be 27 kept, MRP of the Item and PKD of the Item.

Thereafter one person has to stick the label on pallet. H. Put away: – After completion of labeling, the person has to report to in charge. The WMS prepares the put away list which contains the rack address. Then In charge assigns the tasks to machine operator who then keeps the pallet on the rack. After completion of the put away process machine operators have to report to in charge. 2. Outbound: – Sending the goods to RS point or customer point is called the outbound process. There are few sub processes which are to be performed while completion of this process. Following are those sub processes:A.

Order processing: – First all customer have to send their order to a Bangalore based order taking unit. There is an internal network which is used to send the order of goods. A formatted order list comes to DHL warehouse where again it has to be processes. This activity is called order processing activity. B. Shipment Generation: – Shipment generation is the allocation of amount of goods at one go. Once the complete order is received then System people will generate the shipment. This shipment carries a unique number that is called shipment number. Later orders are recognized by this shipment number. C.

Wave Generation: – Waves are the bulk order of materials. There are three waves there which are called wave1, wave2 and wave3. The first two waves completed early in the morning or in night shift and another one wave is completed after noon. These waves are based on order type. D. Truck Allocation: – Truck allocation deals with the requirement of trucks. Basically there are three types are trucks are there Tarus, T1 and T2. This has been categorized on the basis of capacity of trucks. E. Dock Door Allocation: – Once the truck allocation is completed then the system people takes the details about dock doors availability.

According to that the different customer’s goods are loaded at different dock doors. F. WMS: – After Dock Door allocation the report and sheet is sent to WMS people. Then they gather the information about human and machine resources availability. Then the WMS people distribute the work for different loading supervisors which are called task generation. G. Picking: – Once WMS people get all the information they generate the Picking list. Picking is the process in which the items are picked from the warehouse and kept on the central distribution area.

If one complete pallet has to be picked then the picker keeps that pellet directly at dock door otherwise they keep the pellet on central distribution area. 28 H. Central Distribution: – Once the Picking process gets done the central distribution process starts. Central Distribution process is the process where the pallet is broken into the pieces. And then required amount of cases are distributed and kept at the respective dock doors. The Central Distribution Process can be done simultaneously with the Picking process if sufficient resources are available. I. Loading: – Loading is the process to load the goods into the trucks.

The allocated worker loads the trucks under the inspection of supervisor. The supervisor instructs which good has to be loaded and how much quantity has to be loaded. The supervisor gets the loading sheet which contains the details of goods like number of quantity, Name of Quantity, MRP of quantity etc. If all the goods are available then the supervisor has to complete the loading as soon as possible and report to the Shift In charge. If any good is not available that good will be deleted from the loading sheet and the notification will be given on the loading sheet.

Further WMS people update that in the system. 3. Inventory Management: – This is an internal process which is very important to keep accurate and smooth information. This process contains lots of sub process. Following are those sub processes which are briefly described: – A. Replenishment: – Replenishment is the process where required level is maintained. For example, suppose there has to be maintained 100 tones and for further use 50 tones have been drawn then another 50 tones should be kept in that stock. This is termed as replenishment. It is very important process in any warehouse. B.

Ground filling: – This process is to fill the ground level. Actually, there is a racking system to store the stock. It is done to smooth and fasten the picking process. It is like that, when the goods will be at ground level any one can pick from there but if the good will be at higher level one machine will be required to pick from that place. So this process has to be done on daily basis. C. Pallet Merging: – This is the process where two half-filled pallets merged with each other to make space. One important and big issue with warehouse to maintain higher and higher space to keep more and more goods.

But there is one condition both pallet should contain identical goods. This is a daily process. D. Perpetual counting: – This is a process of daily counting to keep accurate stocking according to system. This counting happens on daily basis that is why it is called perpetual counting. This process happens after once picking process is done for all the waves. This newly started process which is very much successful. E. Cycle Counting: – This is weekly basis process. There is one holiday in a week on Sunday. On this day this counting process is done.

This is also called wall to wall counting. In this counting whole stock is counted. If any pallet is at wrong location that is taken out and arranged later on. It is a kind of correcting process. Because, everything is handled by system. There is a special team for this which works throughout the week on this. This team is called inventory team. 29 MAJOR PROCESSES POINT TO BE CONSIDERED There are different areas from where data has been collected for analysis as mentioned above. Area of the major processes where the chances of error are high is the highlighted point to be observed.

These are the points that may cause the error which generally dissatisfies the customers, hence these points I have highlighted in below given flowchart of the different activities. Before collecting the data it is required to understand the processes carefully. And then it is needed to analyze that point of processes. these processes are: In Inbound: a. Palate labeling In Outbound: a. Order Processing b. Central Distribution c. Truck Loading In Picking: a. Putting Palate to the Central Distribution Area In Central Distribution: a. Labeling Dock location to the palate b.

Moving palates to the Dock door Loading of the Trucks: a. Loading Process b. Loading 30 MAJOR PROCESSES FLOW CHART START Flow Chart of Inbound: UNLOADING STACKING START COUNTING/ CHECKING CORREC T NO REMARK SEND TO WMS REMAR K YES CHANGES ENTER DATA PALLETASITATION PASTING THE ADDRESS LEBEL KEEPING THE PALLET IN RACK END 31 OUTBOUND PROCESS START ORDER PROCESS WAVE 2 WAVE 1 WAVE 3 TONNAGE ALLOCATION TRUCK ALLOCATION DOCK-DOOR ALLOCATION WMS PICKING DISTRIBUTION LOADING DISPATCHING FINISH 32 PICKING PROCESS START RESOURCE ALLOCATION PICKING SHEET PRINT RESOURCE ASSIGNMENT MOVING GOODS TO CDA

PUTTING GOODS AT CDA TASK COMPLETION REPORT TO SHIFT INCHARGE. AUTHENTICATION FINISH 33 CENTRAL DISTRIBUTION START RESOURCE ALLOCATION WAVE 2 DISTRIBUTION SHEET PRINT SUPERVISOR ASSIGNMENT CENTRAL DISTRIBUTION LEBELING DOCK LOCATION MOVING GOODS TO DOCK TASK COMPLETION REPORT TO SHIFT INCHARGE. AUTHENTICATION FINISH 34 LOADING PROCESS START ITEM DESCRIPTION FOR EACH SHIPMENT INVOICE PREPARATION BY WMS LOADING SHEET PRINT SUPERVISOR ASSIGNMENT LOADING PROCESS LOADINGS ITEM BY COUNTING LOADING SHEET PRINT LOADING COMPLETION REPORT TO SHIFT INCHARGE. AUTHENTICATION ONE COPY OF INVOICE SUBMITTED TO TRUCK DRIVER

TRUCK TAKES OFF FINISH 35 SOME SNAP SORTS OF ACTIVITIES Unloading Process 1 Unloading Process 2 Loading Process Truck Covering and Binding Truck Covering and Binding Racking System 36 Item Matching Machine Maintenance Battery Charging Unit Empty Pallets Goods are in the Rack Making Correction in Arrangement 37 Photo Board Safety Hamlet Dress Code for Ground Workers Invoice Accuracy Chart Safety Instruction Picture Information Fire extinguisher 38 DHL Working Office Warehouse Inner Part Warehouse Inner Part Worker doing labeling task One type of Goods handling by worker Employee working 39

DATA PROCESSING AND ANALYSIS NAVARATRI CUSTOMER FEEDBACK Navaratri customer Feedback SL. NO. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 RS NAME LAXAMI BALAJI DILIP GANESH JYOTI CHAITANYA GEMINI SHARDA SRIRAM TOTAL EXCELLENT 2 4 8 1 3 9 2 4 5 38 GOOD 5 5 3 10 2 5 8 6 6 50 AVG 8 2 4 4 5 1 4 4 3 35 POOR 0 4 0 0 5 0 1 1 1 12 TOTAL 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 Above table is the feedback taken from the Navaratri Customers by visiting to them and filling the questionnaire from him. OVERALL FEEDBACK RESULT 16 14 12 10 8 6 4 2 0 5 2 LAXAMI 4 1 5 8 10 2 3 CHAITANYA JYOTI 9 2 GEMINI 4 SHARDA 5 SRIRAM 0 4 8 2 0 4 3 5 8 6 6 0 4 5 0 1 5 1 4 1 4 1 3

POOR AVG GOOD EXCELLENT 1 2 3 GANESH 4 BALAJI DILIP 5 6 7 8 9 40 CUSTOMERVISE FEEDBACK IN PERCENTAGE Customer Feedback SL. NO. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 RS NAME LAXAMI % BALAJI % DILIP % GANESH % JYOTI % CHAITANYA % GEMINI % SHARDA % SRIRAM % total % EXCELLENT 5. 3 10. 5 21. 1 2. 6 7. 9 23. 7 5. 3 10. 5 13. 2 100. 0 GOOD 10. 0 10. 0 6. 0 20. 0 4. 0 10. 0 16. 0 12. 0 12. 0 100. 0 AVG 22. 9 5. 7 11. 4 11. 4 14. 3 2. 9 11. 4 11. 4 8. 6 100. 0 POOR 0. 0 33. 3 0. 0 0. 0 41. 7 0. 0 8. 3 8. 3 8. 3 100. 0 CUSTOMER FEEDBACK IN PERCENTAGE Customer feedback SL. NO. 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 RS NAME LAXAMI BALAJI DILIP GANESH JYOTI CHAITANYA GEMINI SHARDA SRIRAM EXCELLENT% 13. 3 % 26. 7 % 53. 3 % 6. 7 % 20. 0 % 60. 0 % 13. 3 % 26. 7 % 33. 3 % GOOD% 33. 3 % 33. 3 % 20. 0 % 66. 7 % 13. 3 % 33. 3 % 53. 3 % 40. 0 % 40. 0 % AVG% 53. 3 % 13. 3 % 26. 7 % 26. 7 % 33. 3 % 6. 7 % 26. 7 % 26. 7 % 20. 0 % POOR% 0. 0 % 26. 7 % 0. 0 % 0. 0 % 33. 3 % 0. 0 % 6. 7 % 6. 7 % 6. 7 % TOTAL% 100. 0 % 100. 0 % 100. 0 % 100. 0 % 100. 0 % 100. 0 % 100. 0 % 100. 0 % 100. 0 % 41 OVERALL CUSTOMER FEEDBACK 9% 28% 26% EXCELLENT GOOD AVG POOR 37% Navaratri Customer Feedback Analysis

As we see out of the total service provided by the DHL 28% if its customer says that its service is excellent, 37% of its customer says that service is good, where 26% of its customer says that its service is average while 9% of the customer says that its service is poor. 42 MODERN TRADE CUSTOMER FEEDBACK CUSTOMER FEEDBACK EXCELLENT KHIWAJ TR. FOOD WORLD HYPERCITY RE. L MAX HYPER RELIANCE RE. FUTURE V RE. SPENCERS RE. HERITAGE FOODS LIFESTYLE INT. Total 4 1 2 4 2 6 2 3 5 29 GOOD 7 10 10 11 9 4 8 8 4 71 AVERAGE 2 2 2 0 2 3 2 3 4 20 POOR 2 2 1 0 2 2 3 1 2 15 Total 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15

OVERALL FEEDBACK OF CUSTOMER 16 14 12 10 8 6 4 6 2 0 4 1 2 4 2 2 3 5 7 10 2 2 2 2 11 4 10 9 8 8 4 1 2 2 3 0 2 2 3 3 2 4 1 2 POOR AVERAGE GOOD EXCELLENT 43 OVERALL CUSTOMER FEEDBACK IN PERCENTAGE 11% 15% 21% EXCELLENT GOOD AVERAGE POOR 53% MODERN TRADE CUSTOMER FEEDBAACK ANALYSIS As we see out of the total service provided by the DHL 21% if its customer says that its service is excellent, 53% of its customer says that service is good, where 15% of its customer says that its service is average while 11% of the customer says that its service is poor. 44

UPCOUNTRY CUSTOMER UPCOUNTRY CUSTOMER Orderi ng S Rs Name 1 Kalyan Agencies 2 Naveen Agencies Pampati 3 Narasimloo Raichooti Subbaiah 4 & Sons 5 Sandesh Agencies Uppu Srishailam & 6 Co Annapurna Trading 7 & Co Thirumala 8 Enterprises Sai sharada 9 agencies 1 Peddi Rajaiah and 0 sons agencies 1 1 Triveni Agencies 1 Annapurna Trading 2 & Co 1 Shree Dhanlaxi 3 Agencies 1 4 Shanmukha Agen 1 Neela 5 Sangameshwara 1 6 Vijya sai agen 1 Sree sai 7 shreeniwahsa dist 1 8 Tirumala Agencies 1 9 Kalyan Enterprise 2 Shree Rajeswara 0 Agencies 2 Ambati Ramaiah 1 Rangaih

Total To E G A P E G A P E G A P E G A P E G A P E G A P 3 0 0 0 1 1 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 2 4 1 4 4 13 0 3 0 0 2 2 1 1 2 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 2 0 0 4 8 3 1 16 1 1 1 0 2 1 3 0 2 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 1 1 0 0 6 2 0 1 0 1 3 2 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 4 3 0 0 0 3 3 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 2 0 0 0 11 1 2 0 0 2 3 1 0 2 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 9 2 1 0 0 2 2 2 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 2 0 0 0 8 2 0 1 0 2 3 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 2 0 0 0 8 1 2 0 0 1 4 1 0 2 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 2 0 0 5 2 1 0 0 1 4 0 1 2 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 9 0 1 2 0 2 2 1 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 2 0 0 0 6 0 1 2 0 0 5 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 2 0 0 2 3 0 0 0 0 6 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 7 2 1 0 0 2 1 3 0 2 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 2 0 0 0 8 3 0 0 0 2 1 3 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 2 0 2 0 0 0 9 0 1 2 0 0 6 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 2 0 0 0 4 1 2 0 0 3 3 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 2 0 0 0 8 0 3 0 0 0 1 2 3 2 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 2 0 0 0 4 2 1 0 0 0 3 2 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 5 0 16 6 4 1 15 5 0 0 16 6 1 0 16 3 4 1 16 5 1 1 15 1 0 1 0 16 5 0 2 16 3 5 1 15 8 6 0 16 7 0 0 14 4 3 0 15 2 5 0 16 8 3 0 15 5 2 0 15 5 3 3 15 4 4 1 11 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Damag Deliver es & ing & Unicon Shorta Schem Billing nect ges es 45 2 2 2 3 2 4 2 5 2 6 2 7 2 8 2 9 3 0 3 1 3 2 3 3 3 4 3 5 3 6 3 7 3 8 3 9 4 0 4 1 4 2 4 3 4 4 4 5 4 6 Vijyay kr soni Noori Agencies 3 0 0 0 5 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 13 2 1 0 0 2 3 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 3 0 0 1 0 0 0 6 0 0 15 8 0 0 14 0 0 0 0 8 0 0 14 8 0 0 14 2 0 0 15 8 0 0 15 8 0 0 14 2 0 0 15 8 0 0 14 2 0 0 15 5 0 0 14 2 0 0 15 6 1 0 16 5 4 0 15 5 4 0 15 6 1 0 16 5 4 0 15 6 1 0 16 5 5 0 16 6 1 0 14 5 5 0 16 5 5 0 16 5 5 0 16 5 5 0 16 Anil Enterprises 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Sri Srinivasa Agencie 2 1 0 0 2 3 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 3 0 0 1 0 0 0 6 Sri Vinayak Agencie SSM Traders Sharan Teja Agencie Sri Sairam Agencie Sri Sai Raghvendra Dhanji bhai rao ji Triveni Agencies 2 1 0 0 2 3 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 3 0 0 1 0 0 0 6 3 0 0 0 5 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 13 2 1 0 0 2 3 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 3 0 0 2 0 0 0 7 2 1 0 0 2 3 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 3 0 0 1 0 0 0 6 3 0 0 0 5 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 13 2 1 0 0 2 3 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 3 0 0 1 0 0 0 6 3 0 0 0 5 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 13

Kalyan Enterprise 2 1 0 0 2 3 0 0 1 1 0 0 3 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 9 Shri Raj Rajeshwara Agencie 3 0 0 0 5 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 13 Vishnu Agencie Sabiha Agencie Shri Vasavi Agencie 1 2 0 0 2 3 1 0 2 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 9 1 1 1 0 2 1 3 0 2 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 1 0 0 6 1 1 1 0 2 1 3 0 2 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 1 0 0 6 Sri Sainath Agencie 1 2 0 0 2 3 1 0 2 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 9 Sri Laxmikant Enterprises 1 1 1 0 2 1 3 0 2 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 1 0 0 6 Syln Agencie 1 2 0 0 2 3 1 0 2 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 9 Padithem pitchaiah sons 1 1 1 0 2 1 3 0 2 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 1 1 0 0 6 C V subbarayubu Sri Saraswathi Krishnaveni Agencie 1 2 0 0 2 3 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 7 1 1 1 0 2 1 3 0 2 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 1 1 0 0 6 1 1 1 0 2 1 3 0 2 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 1 1 0 0 6 M R V Agencie 1 1 1 0 2 1 3 0 2 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 1 1 0 0 6 Sri Venkatashwara General 1 1 1 0 2 1 3 0 2 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 1 1 0 0 6 46 4 7 4 8 4 9 5 0 5 1 5 2 5 3 5 4 5 5 5 6 5 7 5 8 5 9 6 0 6 1 6 2 6 3 6 4

Sri Sribuvas Traders Sri Sathyanarana Sri Laxmivenkatshwara 1 1 1 0 2 1 3 0 2 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 1 1 0 0 6 1 1 1 0 2 1 3 0 2 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 1 1 0 0 6 1 2 0 0 2 3 1 0 2 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 9 5 5 0 16 5 5 0 16 6 1 0 16 4 5 0 15 5 5 0 16 5 5 0 16 6 1 0 16 4 4 0 16 4 4 0 16 4 4 0 16 6 1 0 16 4 4 0 16 4 4 0 16 4 4 0 16 6 1 0 16 4 4 0 16 4 4 0 16 4 3 1 1 4 0 16 1 6 1 93 0 5 5 Dhanlaxmi Agencies 1 1 1 0 2 1 3 0 2 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 1 0 0 0 6 Ambati Ramaiah Rangaih 1 1 1 0 2 1 3 0 2 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 1 1 0 0 6 Vijay Kumar Soni Noori Agencies Anil Enterprises 1 1 1 0 2 1 3 0 2 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 1 1 0 0 6 1 2 0 0 2 3 1 0 2 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 9 1 1 1 0 2 1 3 0 2 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 8

Pavansut Agencies 1 1 1 0 2 1 3 0 2 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 8 Sri Srinivasa Agencie 1 1 1 0 2 1 3 0 2 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 8 Sri Vinayak Agencie SHM Traders Sharan Teja Agencie Sri Sairam Agencie Sri Sai Raghvendra Dhanji bhai rao ji Triveni Agencies Kalyan Enterprise 1 2 0 0 2 3 1 0 2 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 9 1 1 1 0 2 1 3 0 2 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 8 1 1 1 0 2 1 3 0 2 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 8 1 1 1 0 2 1 3 0 2 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 8 1 2 0 0 2 3 1 0 2 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 9 1 1 1 0 2 1 3 0 2 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 8 1 1 1 0 2 1 3 0 2 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 8 1 1 1 0 2 1 8 6 3 2 7 5 1 0 5 1 3 0 1 2 9 6 9 8 2 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 8 1 0 1 4 8 2 8 2 44 6 0 1 0 9 1 9 5 2 9 0 2 9 10 12 14 16 18 0 Kalyan Agencies Raichooti Subbaiah & Sons Annapurna Trading & Co Peddi Rajaiah and sons agencies Shree Dhanlaxi Agencies Vijya sai agen Kalyan Enterprise Vijyay kr soni Sri Srinivasa Agencie Sharan Teja Agencie Dhanji bhai rao ji Shri Raj Rajeshwara Agencie Shri Vasavi Agencie Syln Agencie Sri Saraswathi Sri Venkatashwara General Sri Laxmivenkatshwara Vijay Kumar Soni Pavansut Agencies SHM Traders Sri Sai Raghvendra Kalyan Enterprise Poor Good OVERALL CUSTOMER FEEDBACK 2 4 6 8 RS WISE 47

Average Excellent 48 FEEDBACK AS PER PROCESS Ordering Excellent 87 Good 65 Average 31 Poor 0 Delivery & Billing Excellent 125 Good 126 Average 99 Poor 8 0% 17% 48% 35% Excellent Good Average Poor 2% Excellent 28% 35% 35% Good Average Poor Uniconnect Excellent 106 Good 10 Average 1 Poor 0 Damages & Shortages Excellent 49 Good 81 Average 29 Poor 5 1% 0% 8% Excellent Good Average 91% Poor 18% 3% Excellent 30% 49% Good Average Poor 49 Schemes Excellent 82 Good 29 Average 0 Poor 2 0% 2% 26% 72% Excellent Good Average Poor OVERALL Excellent 449 Good 311 Average 160 Poor 15 2% 17% Excellent 48% Good Average Poor 33% 50 Upcountry Feedback Data Analysis

As we see out of the total service provided by the DHL 48% if its customer says that its service is excellent, 33% of its customer says that service is good, where 17% of its customer says that its service is average while 2% of the customer says that its service is poor. As per process Different services following result came out Ordering Excellent 87 Good 65 Average 31 Poor 0 Delivery & Billing Excellent 125 Good 126 Average 99 Poor 8 Uniconnect Excellent 106 Good 10 Average 1 Poor 0 Damages & Shortages Excellent 49 Good 81 Average 29 Poor 5 Schemes Excellent 82 Good 29 Average 0 Poor 2 OVERALL Excellent 449 Good 311 Average 160 Poor 15 51 LIMITATIONS Research contains the Secondary data for making an operational and marketers analysis, the accuracy and reliability of the analysis depends on reliability of figures derived from data provide by them. ? The sample size for collecting the primary data for customer service was meager as it includes only 25distributors from warehouse, hence the conclusion would not be a universal one. ? Personal biases and prejudices of the customers may also affect the study. ? Because there was time limitation and area limited up to Hyderabad only hence it is not viable for all the regions 52 CHAPTER-4 53 DATA ANALYSIS From the above graphs and charts its clearly shown that there are major problem with stock return and stock shortage. The stock Shortage could be of two causes: A.

Depot Problem: While loading the due to the loading supervisor the shortages of goods problem could be occurred. Sometimes what happens due to the unavailability of good the item has to be deleted from the list. So, if that supervisor does not do this the same invoice will go to the customer. And in the invoice it will be showing the goods but actually it does not exist. So, this type of carelessness errors could be there. B. Transport Problem: – As there is no tracking system, the truck driver can do malpractices. But this is not a big issue because transportation facility is maintained by HUL itself. But it is for concern because DHL has to put effort and time in this.

Navaratri Customer Feedback Analysis As we see out of the total service provided by the DHL 28% if its customer says that its service is excellent, 37% of its customer says that service is good, where 26% of its customer says that its service is average while 9% of the customer says that its service is poor. MODERN TRADE CUSTOMER FEEDBAACK ANALYSIS As we see out of the total service provided by the DHL 21% if its customer says that its service is excellent, 53% of its customer says that service is good, where 15% of its customer says that its service is average while 11% of the customer says that its service is poor. Upcountry Feedback Data Analysis

As we see out of the total service provided by the DHL 48% if its customer says that its service is excellent, 33% of its customer says that service is good, where 17% of its customer says that its service is average while 2% of the customer says that its service is poor. In different services following result came out Ordering Excellent 87 Good 65 Average 31 Poor 0 Delivery & Billing Excellent 125 Good 126 Average 99 Poor 8 Uniconnect Excellent 106 Good 10 Average 1 Poor 0 Damages & Shortages Excellent 49 Poor 2 Good 81 Average 29 Poor 5 Schemes Excellent 82 Good 29 Average 0 54 CHAPTER-5 55 INTERPRETATIONS AND FINDINGS FINDINGS: 1. 2. Trucks were not reaching on time to the customer If trucks reached on time then unloading supervisors were not reaching on time

Interpretation: Customers were not satisfied with the delivery system because trucks were reaching late i. e. one day or two day late to the customer therefore they needed to keep extra stock to mitigate theirs customers need which blocks their extra working money every day. And generally unloading supervisors were reaching late to the customers there were always delay in the delivery because of that they were forced to not to send the same consignments material to theirs customers on same day. 3. 4. 5. There was frequent mismatch in the ordered and delivered items There was frequent shortages in the number of ordered items and received items Child pack along with the mother pack were not being received

Interpretation: This is the complaints of the customer that whatever the items they order there are mismatch in the delivered items and there were huge shortages in the ordered items and when mother pack (item that is to be sold) is sent along with it child pack(free item) were not reaching. 6. 7. 8. Drivers usually forgets the loose packets in the depot Depot shields are not good Customers sometimes were getting empty cartoons Interpretation: generally at the time of loading drivers are not present on the dock door, and when loose packets are to be loaded on the truck it is kept a side to be loaded at the last and when truck is departures then truck driver generally forgets to take these loose packets. When some loose packets are collected and made another new case in the warehouse its packing is not good enough and damages in the way itself.

Since loose packs are again kept in a case and repacked sometimes cases are not filled completely and customers get less number of items as it should be in one case. 9. In Lakame products sometimes customers were receiving nearby expiry stocks. 10. Customers were getting old stocks 11. Settlements of damages, back supply etc. takes long time 56 Interpretation: Due to not proper checking of the items at the time of loading most of the time customers were getting expired items and old stocks. And the settlement of the damages and back supplies were taking very long time because of the long processes that annoys the customers. 12. 13. The chances of damage and shortages are very high in depot package Trucks were having nail and not in good condition because of that customers were getting damaged products

Interpretation: Since the cases are not packed properly and proper considerations are not given at the time of packing there are frequent complaint about the shortage and damage of the items in the cases. And the conditions of the trucks are not good and the trucks are old and proper repairing is not done on time because there are damages of the items happening frequently. 57 CHAPTER-6 58 RECOMMENDATIONS AND DISCUSSIONS ? Proper allocation of works is required. ? . Detergents product should be kept under personal products ? All necessary items and parameter should be checked it out while loading. ? Every step should be taken according to system as system is being followed. ? The upper level labor as well as lower should be trained. Proper allocation of trucks and monitoring of trucks should be there so that truck should not delay and reach on time ? Company should increase the number of supervisors should increased ? Driver should be present at the time of loading ? DHL should improve its shielding process ? Customer feedback is needed on regular basis to know the actual problem facing by Customers. ? Immediate response on customer problem. ? Proper care should be taken when sending the trucks ? There should be proper monitoring systems in the DHL to monitor the stocks being old should be dispatches earlier ? There should be improvement in the process of the settlement in the damage and back supply stocks ?

Proper repair of the truck should be taken care so that customer should get good in proper condition ? There should be increase in the number of trucks to reduce the work load on one truck and delivery could be done on time. 59 BIBLIOGRAPHY www. google. com www. dhl. com www. scribd. com www. slideshare. com Refer to Book of Operation Refer to Operation Journal 60 Questionnaire CUSTOMER DELIGHT Date RS code RS Name Sales Area Person spoken to Contact No Email ID : : : : : : : Feedback Ordering Are you comfortable with Ordering Process Are you comfortable with the Norms / PDP* Are you satisfied with RS net helpline Delivery and Billing Are you seeing improvement in CCFOT/OTIF levels Are you able to meet market rders with your closing stk* Are you getting stks delivered on on time Are you happy with depot responsiveness Are stks getting delivered in proper condition* Are you getting new launch stks adequately Uniconnect(1800 425 2901) Have you ever logged in compliants with Uniconnect/Levercare Are you happy with responses in levercare* Damages/Shortages Are shortages / Damages cleared by depot on time* 15 Excellent 10 5 0 Good Average Poor If shortages are there, which are recurring SKUs* In which products would you suggest improvement in product/packaging quality* Schemes Do you get ontime communication on Schemes Do you have any concerns which are yet to be addressed by your TSO/KE* 61 Any other concerns/queries Note: Questions marked with * are the ones where detailed responses are expected. Pl ensure all the details in response are captured in Remarks Column

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