Language A1 World Literature—Assessment Assignment

Language A1 World Literature—Assessment Assignment Words: 3410

Language A1 World  Literature—Assessment Introduction To complete the assessment requirements of the language Al course, all candidates must submit written assignments based on the world literature works they have studied. These are referred to as “world literature assignments”. World literature assignments: • must be written during the course • are externally assessed against four criteria related to the objectives of the language Al course. At both HL and SL, world literature accounts for 20% of each candidate’s overall language Al grade.

Candidates who fail to submit world literature assignments for assessment will not be awarded a final overall grade for the language Al they have studied. Assignment Requirements • Candidates must write their assignment(s) independently but with the supervision of a teacher. • Candidates must themselves select the aspects on which they wish to write, generate topics and  formulate their own assignment titles. • Each assignment must be written in the language Al being studied. • Each assignment must be 1000—1500 words in length. • Each world literature work must be used in one assignment only. At least two world literature works, studied in part I of the syllabus, must be included in assignment 1. • At HL, a minimum of three world literature works must be covered across the two assignments. • All candidates must sign a written declaration to confirm that each assignment is their own work Assignment Description and Objectives Assignment 1 (HL and SL) This assignment consists of a comparative study of at least two world literature works studied in part 1 of the course. This is the only world literature assignment that can be based on an aspect of two or more world literature works.

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Experience suggests that most candidates write better assignments using two works, but some candidates are able to write very well on three. All works used for this assignment must be taken from part 1 of the school’s language Al course. This assignment allows candidates to: • demonstrate the skills of presenting a comparative literary analysis • compare the literary aspects common to the works studied in part 1 of the course • explore possible links or relationships between the works in ways that show individual insight, personal engagement and an appreciation of the cultural similarities and/or differences relevant to the analysis.

Assignment 2 (HL only) Candidates choose one of three alternatives, 2a, 2b, 2c. Assignment 2a: comparative study This assignment consists of a comparative study based on one world literature work studied in part 1, part 3 or part 4 of the course, and one language Al work chosen from any part of the course. Unlike assignment I, this assignment must not be based on a study of two world literature works. The world literature work chosen for this assignment must not be one previously used for assignment 1. This assignment allows candidates to: demonstrate the skills for presenting a comparative literary analysis •   compare the literary aspects common to a selected world literature work and a language A1 work • explore possible links or relationships between the two works in ways that show individual      insight, personal engagement and an appreciation of the cultural similarities and/or differences    relevant to the analysis. Assignment 2b: imaginative or creative assignment This assignment consists of an imaginative or creative piece of writing.

It may be based on a study of one world literature work, or on a combination of a world literature work and a language Al work chosen from any part of the course. The world literature work chosen for this assignment can be a work studied in part I, part 3 or part 4 of the syllabus but must not be one previously used for assignment I. This assignment must be preceded by a statement of intent that will be included in the total number of words. The statement of intent is an essential part of this type of assignment and allows candidates to make explicit their perception of an author’s imagination, values and techniques.

This assignment allows candidates to: •   demonstrate the skills of imaginative or creative writing • focus on a particular literary aspect of interest and explore this imaginatively and in a variety of    ways • show an appreciation of the cultural elements relevant to the selected aspect •  demonstrate both explicit (in the statement of intent) and implicit (in the creative piece) awareness of the imagination, values and    techniques of the author(s) on whose works the assignment is based. Assignment 2c: detailed study

Assignment 2c consists of a detailed study based on an aspect of one world literature work studied in part 1, part 3 or part 4 of the syllabus. However, this must not be a work previously used for assignment 1. The assignment could take the form of a formal essay or a commentary or an analysis of a key passage. This assignment allows candidates to: • demonstrate the skills of close reading and detailed analytical writing •   show an appreciation of the cultural elements relevant to the analysis. Features of an Appropriate World Literature Assignment Topic Appropriate topics are characterized by: a focus on the literary aspects of the work(s) to be used • clearly articulated titles that provide sufficient information about the topics chosen and the    writer’s intentions • awareness of the implications of the assessment criteria regarding the length, breadth and depth     of discussion required • a discussion that goes beyond only a description of the characters or events of the works. It is not appropriate for candidates in the same class or teaching group to base all their essays for assignment 1 on the same two works from part 1, nor is it appropriate for them to use the same single work for assignment 2.

Teachers should encourage candidates to choose a diversity of works for both assignments. Where circumstances make it difficult for candidates to choose completely different aspects and/or topics, they should: • base their assignments on different combinations of the part I works studied • adopt different approaches. Choice of an appropriate and focused aspect The following titles for world literature assignments are intended for guidance only.

With assignments 1, 2a and 2c (formal essay only), the pairings offered illustrate that focused topics (indicated by the first title) should be encouraged rather than broad topics (indicated by the second title). Assignment 1: comparative study (on at least two world literature works from part 1 ) “The significance of ‘black’ in The Outsider and The Metamorphosis” is better than “Style in The Outsider and The Metamorphosis” “The presentation and significance of marital conflicts in Song of Lawino and Madame Bovary” is better than “Women in Song of Lawino and Madame Bovary”. The relationship between plot structure and character development in Oedipus Rex and Mother Courage and Her Children: An investigation into the portrayal of Oedipus and Anna Fierling” is better than “Characterization in Oedipus Rex and Mother Courage and Her Children”. “The symbol of the house in One Hundred Years of Solitude and The Time of the Doves” is better than “Symbolism in One Hundred Years of Solitude and The Time of the Doves”. “A comparison of the creation and functions of dramatic tension in Hedda Gabbler and Uncle Vanya” is better than “Hedda Gabler and Uncle Vanya: A comparative study”. Characterization and plot structure in The Wedding of Zein and Other Stories and White Justice is better than ‘The Short Story in the hands of Tayeb Salih and Antreassian”. Assignment 2a: comparative study (one world literature work and one language A1 work) “The nature and significance of social conflicts in God’s Bits of Wood and A Fine Balance” is better than “Conflicts in God’s Bits of Wood and A Fine Balance”. “A comparison of the sources and functions of humour in The Suffrage of Elvira and A Man of the People” is better than “A comparative study of The Suffrage of Elvira and A Man of the People as works of comedy”. A comparison of the presentation and significance of the father figure in Kokoro and Fiela’s Child” is better than “Men in Kokoro and Fielda’s Child”. “Attitudes to politics and religion in The House of the Spirits and Petals of Blood”is better than “Politics and religion in The House of the Spirits and Petals of Blood”. “The role of music and mime in I Will Marry When I Want and The Trial of Mallam llya” is better than “Dramatic techniques in I Will Many When I Want and The Trial of Mallam llya”. “A comparison of images of death in the poetry of Szymborska and Owen” is better than “Death in the poetry of Szymborska and Owen”.

Assignment 2b: imaginative or creative assignment (one world literature work, or one world literature work and one language A1 work) Experience suggests that the problem most candidates have with assignment 2b is related more to how to execute the tasks they set themselves than to the formulation of a viable assignment topic. The examples offered here therefore illustrate appropriate assignment topics and inappropriate approaches. Appropriate assignment topics An editorial published by the People’s Herald on the meeting convened by Dr Thomas Stockmann  (based on An Enemy of the People by Henrik Ibsen).

Aissatou’s response: a reply from Aissatou explaining and justifying her reaction to her husband’s betrayal (based on So Long a Letter by Mariama Ba). Inappropriate assignment topics An interview with Ibsen, in which the interviewer only asks questions about Ibsen’s personal life, for example, “Did you have an unhappy marriage, Mr Ibsen? ” A dramatic monologue by Vladimir, in which the candidate only repeats statements made in Waiting for Godot. “Hamida’s Diary”, in which the candidate only paraphrases parts of Naguib Mahfouz’s Midaq Alley.

An alternative ending to The Outsider in which Meursault escapes to find true happiness on a desert island with Marie. Guidance for candidates Candidates who choose to write imaginative or creative assignments should be: •  guided towards ensuring that the assessment criteria for world literature can be properly applied to the tasks they set themselves •   made aware that the tasks they undertake must reveal knowledge of and insight into the literary  features of the works on which they are based •   made aware of the need to avoid:    following the original work so closely that they do no more than replace portions of it              with arbitrary alternatives •   departing so far from the original that the piece they create reveals little evidence of               knowledge, understanding and appreciation of the original. Assignments that demonstrate no appreciation of the significance and functions of ambiguity or complexity in a work do not normally score high marks. Tasks aimed at “improving” the original often fall into this category and include approaches such as: • exacting revenge on the villains • allowing the escape of the protagonists explaining the inexplicable. Assignment 2c: detailed study (one world literature work) A formal essay “Symbols of hope and despair in the poetry of Pablo Neruda” is better than “Language in the poetry of Pablo Neruda”. “Attitudes to oppression in The House of the Spirit” is better than “Oppression in The House of the Spirit”. Analysis of a key passage, analysis of two key passages, commentary on an extract While it is not possible to provide examples of appropriate and inappropriate topics for these options, the following advice should be useful for candidates wishing to choose any of them.

The choice of a key passage or key passages for analysis or of an extract for commentary should be guided by the following questions: Key passage (s) • Why is this passage (or why are these passages) central to our understanding of the work? In       other words, why is it a key passage, or why are they key passages? Commentary •   Why can this passage be seen as characteristic of the writer’s central concerns and/or     techniques? The main difference between the two exercises relates to the nature of the candidate’s focus. In an analysis of a key passage (see diagram A) candidates are expected to:   explain why the passage chosen is central to our understanding of the work •   focus outwards on the larger work from which it has been taken, to show its    relationship to the development of the plot, and to examine what it shows about elements such      as theme, style and characters. In a commentary (see diagram B), candidates are expected to: •  explain why the particular extract has been selected for this kind of analysis •   focus closely on the extract itself in order to analyse how elements such as language, structure and tone work together within it to create or enhance meaning. pic] Key The black arrows represent the main focus of the analysis or commentary. The transparent arrows represent the complementary focus. Frequently Asked Questions—Assessment The topic and its selection Who selects the topics on which candidates write their assignments? It is the responsibility of the candidates themselves to choose the topics on which they wish to write their world literature assignment(s). Candidates are expected to:          select a viable aspect of the world literature works they have studied •         ensure that the aspect selected lends itself to a literary discussion •         create an appropriate topic for the assignments) •         select a topic and/or treatment distinct from those of other candidates at their school. Candidates should discuss their choices with their teachers. However, teachers must not assign set topics to candidates nor provide a list from which each candidate chooses a topic. Are translation exercises acceptable as world literature assignments?

No. While translation exercises would seem legitimate, given that the majority of world literature works are normally studied in translation, such exercises create difficulties in the assessment process. Examiners cannot: •  read translated works in their original versions, or in languages other than the particular    language Al •   rely solely on any candidate’s claims, assertions and interpretations of the works used for      assignments, which the examiner cannot read. For these reasons, a translation exercise based on a study of an original ork and its translation into the language Al studied is not acceptable. However, an exercise based on a study of different translations of the same work into the language A I studied is acceptable. Is it acceptable to base a world literature assignment on a comparison between a world literature work and a version of it (or of another work) in film? No. While examiners for world literature are required to have thorough knowledge of the work(s) on which assignments are based they cannot: •  also be familiar with film version(s)   base their marking only on candidates’ claims, assertions and interpretations of films. For these reasons, assignments of this kind are not acceptable. Is it possible to have assignment topics approved by IBCA before they are undertaken? This is not a requirement and is not regular practice, but guidance is available from IBCA if the validity or viability of a proposed topic is in doubt. Can topics be presented in the form of questions? Yes, although it would be unusual (and perhaps indicative of undue teacher intervention) for all the candidates from one school to present their topics as questions.

The assignment—use of works Can the world literature work studied in part 4 be used for assignment 2 even if the candidate has already used it for the individual oral presentation? Yes. Can assignment I be based on one work of world literature only? No. Can the analysis of two key passages (assignment 2c) be based on two world literature works? No. The assignment—writing and format Is it necessary for candidates to refer to secondary sources -when writing their world literature assignments? No. Is it obligatory for candidates to use a word processor for their assignments?

No, assignments can also be typewritten or handwritten. However, where assignments are handwritten it is the candidate’s responsibility to ensure that the writing is legible and clear: marks cannot be awarded to what cannot be read. Is it compulsory to have a bibliography? Candidates are expected to acknowledge fully all the ideas or material of other people that they have used or consulted in the writing of their assignments. This includes use of Internet sources. Failure to do so would constitute plagiarism, which must be avoided. Examiners also need to know which translations are being used.

Does the IBO have a preferred style for the citation of reference works and the presentation of bibliographies? No, the IBO does not favour any particular style as long as candidates are consistent in the use of the style they choose. Must quotations, footnotes and bibliographies all be included in the word counts for the assignments? Quotations from works are included in the word count but footnotes and bibliographies are not. Where footnotes are used they must not contain arguments or ideas that should be included in the main body of the assignment, but have been included as footnotes to decrease the word count.

Similarly, the statement of intent for an assignment 2b is  included in the word count,  but the accompanying extract(s) on which an assignment 2c is based is not. Must a statement of intent be provided for all world literature assignments? No, the statement of intent is required only for assignment 2b. However, in the case of the other assignments, an introduction is required. Teacher’s role and editing How and to what extent should teachers be involved in the writing of world literature assignments? Teachers should:    assist candidates with their choice of an appropriate and  focused topic for their assignments  but must not give topics to candidates •  ensure that candidates in a teaching group do not work on the same topic (where this is  unavoidable, candidates must work independently and produce different assignments, with different arguments based on individually chosen evidence) •  discuss assignment outlines with candidates before they write their first drafts •   read and make general comments (orally or on a separate sheet of paper) on the first draft    of each assignment   neither correct the assignments nor write any comments on the assignments themselves   (unless a candidate abandons a proposed assignment and begins a new one, no further    teacher input is allowed after the first draft stage) •   collect the final version of each candidate’s assignment by the school’s internal deadline •   read each assignment to ascertain that it is the candidate’s own work •  neither correct nor award marks to any assignment •   sign the appropriate space on each cover sheet to confirm the authenticity of the work     submitted by each candidate.

Is it acceptable for candidates to edit each other’s assignment(s)? No, each assignment must be the independent work of the candidate who submits it. However, it is acceptable for candidates to make class presentations of their assignments (or excerpts of their assignments), answer questions and consider suggestions arising from the discussion that follows. Is it acceptable to return final versions of assignments to candidates for further checks and amendments if internal school deadlines permit?

Yes, this is especially useful if candidates write their assignments relatively early in the course. It allows the assignments to benefit from the candidates ‘ intellectual growth and development over the duration of the course. However, where this is done, teachers must read the assignments again to confirm that each final version submitted is the candidate’s own work. Candidates must not change their topics or start a new assignment at this stage. Guidelines for Assignments not Complying with Regulations Introduction

From May 2004 onwards, the following guidelines will apply to assignments that do not comply with regulations. Repetition of works (HL only) Works must not be repeated across assignments. If this happens, assignment 2 will be awarded no more than achievement level 3 for criterion B. Use of incorrect works Where the candidate uses incorrect works (for example, assignment I is not based on works from the PWL) the assignment will be awarded achievement level 0 for criterion B and no more than achievement level 3 for each of criteria A, C and D. No statement of intent

A statement of intent is required for assignment 2b (the imaginative or creative assignment). Where no statement of intent exists, the assignment will be marked as normal but will be brought down by one level for criterion C. Assignment above or below word count Assignments can be between 10% below and 10% above the word count. Outside this range, assignments will be brought down by one level for criterion C. Assignment 1 based on one work only An assignment I based only on one part I work will be awarded achievement level 0 for each of criterion A and criterion B.

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