Industrial Engineering Assignment

Industrial Engineering Assignment Words: 3115

Industrial Engineers help to create an improved and more industrious society. This report explains exactly what an Industrial Engineer does, how and where they would find a job doing such, how much the average Industrial Engineer is annually paid, and what education is required to qualify for success in that career field. An interview with a Dr. Don Malzahn from the Wichita State University (WSU) Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering (IMfgE) department is included to better illustrate the profession of Industrial Engineering, which helps to improve our day to day industrial productivity.

Without this field our world would be drastically set back and lives would be severely inconvenienced. Table of Contents Title PagePage 1 AbstractPage 2 Table of ContentsPage 3 Field DescriptionPage 4 WSU Industrial Engineering ProgramPage 5 Four Year PlanPage 6-7 Freshman Year Courses & DescriptionsPages 8-10 College of Engineering RequirementsPage 11 Transferable CreditsPage 12 Tuition and Costs for Freshman YearPage 12 Admission Requirements to WSUPage 12 High School RequirementsPage 13 Interview with Dr. Don MalzahnPages 14-17 SummaryPage 18 BibliographyPage 19 Field Description

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Industrial Engineers apply scientific knowledge to solve specific problems in manufacturing and other industries, businesses, and institutions, focusing on productivity improvement through better use of human resources, financial resources, natural resources and man-made structures and equipment. Industrial Engineers apply a full range of analytical, simulation, and experimentation tools that are applied to problems in designing, planning, implementing, and operating systems. These problems are found in a wide variety of service organizations, project-based firms, and product-based firms.

Areas of Specialization/Duties and Responsibilities Industrial Engineering is a very broad discipline and they have to be or become competent in a wide variety of areas. They have to figure out what they need to know and they have to find a way to learn it. This is different than most engineers, who get deeper and deeper into one specific area. Industrial Engineers’ value to the organization increases as they become competent in more areas. The main focus of Industrial Engineering is systems integration and improvement.

Government economists expect jobs for Industrial Engineers to grow as fast as the average for all occupations through 2014. Expected Salary Ranges The United States Bureau of Labor Statistics estimates the average yearly pay of Industrial Engineers in the year of 2006 as $70,630 pay. A 2005 survey by the National American College of Engineering listed salary offers for Industrial Engineering students about to graduate: Bachelor’s degree candidates average $49,567 pay, Master’s degree candidates averaged $56,561 pay, and PhD degree candidates averaged $85,000 pay.

The Industrial Engineering Program at WSU The Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering department at WSU takes responsibility for instruction and research in design, analysis and operation of manufacturing and other integrated systems of people, material, equipment and capital. The Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering Department offers curricula and educational experience designed and continuously improved through the involvement and contribution of its constituents: students and alumni, potential employers of program graduates, and faculty.

The Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering department offers two undergraduate degree programs; one in Industrial Engineering (BSIE) and another in manufacturing engineering (BSMgE). Both programs are accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology. Modern, well-equipped laboratories are available to supplement classroom theory in ergonomics, manufacturing engineering, and computer analysis.

The Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering department’s laboratory facilities include: Graphics Lab, Metrology Lab, CIM Lab, Cessna Manufacturing Processes Lab, Ergonomics / Human Factors Lab, Non-Traditional Machining Lab, Advanced Manufacturing Process Lab, Rapid Prototyping, Virtual Reality Development Lab, Graduate Computing Lab, Open Computing Lab. Students in the academic programs offered by the industrial and manufacturing engineering department get ample opportunity to work on real-life problems in local industries as part of course and project requirements. Four Year Plan Freshman

Course Hrs Engl. 101/100 and 102, College English I and II 6 Math. 242Q and 243, Calculus I and II10 Phys. 313Q University Physics I4 Chem. 211, General Chemistry5 IME 222, Engineering Graphics3 IME 258, Manufacturing Methods and Materials I3 Sophomore Course Hrs Math. 511, Linear Algebra3 AE 223, Statistics3 ECE 138, Engineering Computing in C3 IME 254, Engineering Probability & Statistics I3 IME 255, Engineering Economy3 IME 452, Work Systems3 IME 524, Engineering Probability & Statistics II 3 IME 11Q Communication, Public Speaking3 Phil 385, Ethics/Professionalism3 IME 550, Operations Research3

Phys 314Q University Physics II4 Humanities, Social Science or Fine Arts Electives*3 Junior Courses Hrs Math. 344, Calculus III 3 ME 250, Materials Engineering3 IME 549, Industrial Ergonomics 3 IME 553, Production Systems 3 IME 554, Statistical Quality Control 3 IME 563, Facilities Planning2 IME 565, Systems Simulation3 ECE 282 Circuits I4 Technical Electives **. 3 Humanities, Social Science or Fine Arts Electives*3 Senior Course Hrs ME 398, Thermodynamics I 3 IME 556, Information Systems 3 IME 590, Industrial Engineering Design I 3 IME 690, Industrial Engineering Design II 3 Technical Electives ** 6

Natural Science Elective§ 3 Humanities, Social Science or Fine Arts Electives*6 Freshman Year Courses and Descriptions at WSU Engl. 101/100 and 102, College English I and II6 hours >ENGL 100. English Composition (3). A required composition course for non-native-speaking students scoring below a certain level as determined by a departmental placement examination or ACT scores. Emphasizes reading and writing skills appropriate to academic discourse. Integrates the writing process, rhetorical modes, and library skills into writing assignments related primarily to nonfiction readings.

Prerequisites: Qualifying score on ACT or placement exam, or successful completion of ENGL 013 or ENGL 015. Substitutes as ENGL 101 for non-native speaking students. >ENGL 101. College English I (3). General education basic skills course. Focuses on developing reading and writing skills appropriate to academic discourse. Integrates the writing process, rhetorical modes, and library skills into writing assignments related primarily to nonfiction readings. Prerequisite: qualifying score on ACT or placement exam, or successful completion of ENGL 011. >ENGL 102. College English II (3). General education basic skills course.

Emphasizes critical reading, research, and argumentation. ENGL 102 should be taken after ENGL 101 in the freshman year. Prerequisite: ENGL 101, with a C or better. Math. 242Q and 243, Calculus I and II 10 hours >MATH 242. Calculus I (5). General education introductory course. Analytic geometry and the calculus in an interrelated form. Credit in both MATH 242 and 144 is not allowed. Prerequisites: MATH 112 with a C or better or two units of high school algebra, and one unit of high school geometry and one-half unit of high school trigonometry, or MATH 123 and 111 with a C or better in each. >MATH 243.

Calculus II (5). General education further study course. A continuation of MATH 242. Includes a study of integration and applications and an introduction to infinite series. Prerequisite: MATH 242 with a C or better. Phys. 313Q University Physics I4 hours >PHYS 313. University Physics I (4). General education introductory course. The first semester of a calculus-based physics sequence. Studies mechanics, heat, and wave motion. High school physics or PHYS 151 is assumed as prerequisite for this course. Natural science majors are required to take the lab, PHYS 315, which accompanies this course.

Credit is not given for both PHYS 213 and 313. Co requisite: MATH 243. Chem. 211, General Chemistry 5 hours >CHEM 211. General Chemistry I (5). 3R; 4L. Lab fee. General education introductory course. An introduction to the general concepts of chemistry. Includes chemical stoichiometry, atomic and molecular structure, bonding, gas laws, states of matter, and chemical periodicity. CHEM 211-212 meets the needs of students who may wish to take more than one course in chemistry. Credit is allowed in only one of the following: CHEM 211, 103, or 110.

Prerequisites: a college-level chemistry course such as CHEM 110, 101, or 103, or high school chemistry or physics; and concurrent enrollment in MATH 111 or two units of high school algebra or MATH 011. IME 222, Engineering Graphics3 hours >IME 222. Engineering Graphics (3). 1R; 3L. Uses computer graphics to produce technical drawings and solve engineering design problems. Studies basic spatial relationships involving orthographic projections, auxiliary views, and pictorial projections. Design implementation includes dimensioning, tolerance, sectional views, threaded fasteners, blueprint reading, and working drawings.

Also uses descriptive geometry to find true lengths of lines; spatial relationships between points, lines, and planes; and intersections of solids, surfaces, and conic sections. Prerequisite: MATH 123 or equivalent. IME 258, Manufacturing Methods and Materials I3 hours >IME 258. Manufacturing Methods and Materials I (3). 2R; 3L. Provides a basic understanding of materials and processes used to manufacture products. Some of the major manufacturing processes covered include metal machining, metal forming, extrusion, casting, joining, and plastics forming.

Emphasizes the use of materials, sciences and mathematics to understand the behavior of materials undergoing the manufacturing process. Includes an introduction to process planning. Students gain an extensive hands-on experience in different manufacturing processes and in teamwork. Prerequisite: MATH 123. College of Engineering Requirements (1) PHIL 385, Engineering Ethics, is a required course in humanities under the general education requirements described above. (2) Mathematics and natural sciences: 32-34 hours of mathematics and natural sciences must be completed, as prescribed by each department. 3) Core requirements (13 hours): AE 223, Statistics (3 hrs. ); ECE 282, Circuits I (4 hrs. ); IME 255, Engineering Economy (3hrs. ); and ME 398, Thermodynamics (3 Hrs) These are courses that all engineering students must complete, regardless of major. (4) Department requirements: Each department has specific courses that must be completed. These courses and their prerequisites are in the departmental sections of the Catalog and are listed on the departmental check sheets. (5) Technical electives: Additional courses required, but not specified, by the department of engineering.

Each should be chosen in consultation with a departmental adviser. (6) In response to the recommendation of the National Academy of Engineering report on the future needs for engineering graduates, the College of Engineering has implemented the Engineer of 2020 program. Beginning with the Fall 2007 class, to fulfill the requirements for an engineering BA at WSU, each student will complete the program course requirements including at least 3 of the following 6 activities: undergraduate research; cooperative education or internship; global learning or study abroad; service learning; leadership; and multi-disciplinary education.

This program will make the educational experience more meaningful to the student and make the student more desirable to many industries. High School Requirements In order to graduate from Unified School District-259 at Northeast Magnet High School in the Science Magnet there are certain requirements that one must meet. These guidelines are set by the Unified School District-259 district, Northeast Magnet High School administration, the Kansas Board of Regents.

Students must complete: four credits of English, (including I, II, III, IV); four credits of mathematics, (with grades of C or better in Algebra II and Pre-Calculus); 7 credits of science; 3 credits of social studies, (including World History, US History I and II, and Government); one unit of computer technology; two credits of foreign language; one credit of physical education; and four annual magnet projects, (with a grade of C or better. ) Each student graduating Northeast Magnet High School is expected to accumulate a minimum number of twenty five credits in their four year term, and receive a twenty three or better composite ACT score.

It is recommended that they get a cumulative Grade Point Average of two point zero or above. Transferable Credits Students wishing to receive transfer credits for engineering courses taken at other institutions prior to admission to Wichita State University must submit their transcripts and course descriptions and syllabi to the Wichita State University College of Engineering for evaluation. Courses considered for transfer credit must have at least a grade of C or better. Degree – bound Wichita State University students should speak with an adviser before enrolling in courses at another institution.

FEESResident UndergradNon-Resident Undergrad Tuition – Regular Semester and Summer Session Per Credit Hour$130. 40$375. 30 Student Fee – Regular Semester and Summer Session Per Credit Hour*$25. 00$25. 00 Facilities Use Fee Per Credit Hour**$3. 60$3. 60 University Registration Fee – Per Semester$17. 00$17. 00 Tuition and Costs for the Freshman Year at WSU Admission Requirements to WSU To Be Admitted You Must Meet These Criteria Kansas residents must: 1. Achieve an ACT composite score of 21 or above or a minimum combined SAT-I score of 980, OR 2. Rank in the top one-third of their high schools’ graduating class, OR . Complete the pre-college curriculum with at least a 2. 0 grade point average on a 4. 0 scale. Interview with Dr. Don Malzahn (Professor and Undergraduate Coordinator at Wichita State University) Interviewed on September 12th, 2007 Currently Dr. Don Malzahn is leading a Kaizen event in the hydro-forming department. This is a major project designed to reduce the number of defects produced and increase the production rate of this department. A Kaizen event is a week long, and the department is shut down but all of the employees are involved in identifying and implementing improvements.

There are five other people assigned full time for a week to the event; people from operations, other industrial engineers, facilities, and from accounting. They are developing specific targets for improvement to be achieved by the end of each day of the event. Dr. Don Malzahn’s responsibilities are as follows: to do all the preparation for the event, manage its execution, document its performance, and report to management the ultimate results. Answer 1: I have the responsibility for maintaining & improving the quality and efficiency of a manufacturing department in a local aircraft manufacturer.

I have to respond to problems by involving the workers, supervisors, & managers in developing & implementing a solution. It’s pretty fast paced & I have to work with a lot of different people. When I help the area perform better, it makes everyone happy. Question 2: How much time do you spend at the computer? Answer 2: 20% Question 3: How much time do you spend out in the field? Answer 3: Fifty percent. Question 4: What is your specialty in Industrial Engineering? Answer 4: Industrial Engineering is a very broad discipline and I have to be or become competent in a wide variety of areas.

I have figure out what I need to know and find a way to learn it. This is different that most engineers who get deeper and deeper into a specific area. My value to the organization increases as become competent in more areas. Question 5: How long have you been an Industrial Engineer? Answer 5: About thirty five years. Question 6: What is a typical day for you, as an Industrial Engineer? Answer 6: I spend about twenty percent to thirty percent of my time in the office at a desk performing some kind of analysis.

About fifty percent of the time I am out on the floor or talking with other professionals. This is the effort required to develop the data and information that identifies the true nature of a problem and helps develop alternative solutions. The rest of the time is spent in meetings. In these meeting I typically serve as the voice of reason because I have seen the problem first hand, understand how a complex organization functions, and have good communication skills. Question 7: How are the job outlooks for Industrial Engineers? Answer 7: Excellent!

Local industries are hiring all they can find and the national data indicates that Industrial Engineer is one of the fastest growing engineering disciplines. Question 8: Is there any specific equipment required to be an Industrial Engineer? Answer 8: Not really, but computer and communication skills are helpful. Question 9: What types of projects have you worked on or are you working on? Answer 9: Currently I am leading a Kaizen event in hydro-forming department. This is a major project designed to reduce the number of defects produced and increase the production rate of this department.

A Kaizen event is a week long and the department is shut down but all of the employees are involved in identifying and implementing improvements. There are five other people assigned full time for a week to the event; people from operations, other industrial engineers, facilities, and from accounting. We are developing specific targets for improvement to be achieved by the end of each day of the event. My responsibilities are as follows: to do all the preparation for the event, manage its execution, document its performance, and report to management the ultimate results.

Question 10: Do you need to work with individuals from other fields of engineering? Answer 10: Yes, we work with the design engineers in cross functional teams on product changes and all kinds of engineers involved with the facility and tooling. Question 11: Where are the major cities/states for Industrial Engineering jobs? Answer 11: Just about anywhere. Industrial Engineerss work in all kinds of manufacturing including electronics and pharmaceuticals. A growing area of employment for Industrial Engineers is in service delivery such as health care and financial institutions.

Question 12: What is your position at Wichita State University? Answer 12: Professor of Industrial Engineering. Question 13: What was college like for you? Answer 13: (From a student’s perspective) The classes took a lot of time because there was always homework but I enjoyed it because I was solving problems and I enjoyed that part. Getting involved in student organizations also was enjoyable and having a co-op position in my last two gave me an opportunity to see my classroom experience applied to the real world. Question 14: On average, how much does an Industrial Engineer make?

Answer 14: It depends on whether you had coop experience or not but with experience $55,000 to $60,000 at the start is not unusual. Industrial Engineering Summary This essay has not just been a regular assignment, but moreover it has been an amazing learning experience. Through quite a lot of deep and thorough exploration and quite a lot of research I have been able to chart out a possible future educational path and possibly even one of the careers I would wish to do as an Industrial Engineer. I have learned through my monotonous investigation what it is like being an Industrial Engineering student and an Industrial Engineer.

I have also learned that, numerous colleges and universities offer excellent courses in Industrial Engineering and they also have breathtaking mechanical engineering programs, several of which are quite attainable curriculums. Industrial Engineers help to keep the gears of industry (and life) turning, quite literally. The world needs numerous talented Industrial Engineers to keep the gears in our life productive. Bibliography 1. Wichita State University. Sep 2007. Course Catalog 2007-2008. <http://www. collegesource. org/displayinfo/catalink. asp? id={796A8947-0695-4A76-9DFF-5F2C8296317B}&oig={78AC3888-D5B8-4B8D-8F51-BCB5769AFEB3}&vt=5>. Accessed 2007 Sep 13. 2. Malzahn, Dr. Don. 2007 September 12. Careers in Industrial Engineering. 3. Wichita State University. Sep 2007. Visitors Homepage. <http://www. wichita. edu>. Accessed 2007 Sep 11. 4. US News. Aug 2007. USNews. com: America’s Best Colleges 2007: Industrial / Manufacturing. U. S. News & World Report ;http://colleges. usnews. rankingsandreviews. com/usnews/edu/college/rankings/brief/enps08_brief. php;. Accessed 2007 Aug 31. . Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering. Sep 2007. Visitors Homepage. ;www. imfge. wichita. edu;. Accessed 2007 Sep 10. 6. College Board. Sep 2007. Career Profiles. ;http://www. collegeboard. com/csearch/majors_careers/profiles/majors/14. 3501. html;. Accessed 2007 Sep 12. 7. Washington Accord. Sep 2007. Industrial Engineering Informaton. ;http://www. washingtonaccord. org; . Accessed Sep 12. 8. The Society for Modeling & Simulation International. Sep 2007. Industrial Engineering Informaton. ;www. scs. org;. Accessed Sep 12.

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