Career Retention Specialist Assignment

Career Retention Specialist Assignment Words: 9182

MCI 0084 MARINE CORPS INSTITUTE CAREER RETENTION SPECIALIST MARINE BARRACKS WASHINGTON, DC UNITED STATES MARINE CORPS MARINE CORPS INSTITUTE 912 CHARLES POOR STREET SE WASHINGTON NAVY YARD DC 20391-5680 IN REPLY REFER TO: 1550 Ser 0084 30 Sep 05 From: Director To: Marine Corps Institute Student Subj: CAREER RETENTION SPECIALIST (MCI 0084) 1. Purpose. The subject course provides instruction on the basic tasks of the Career Retention Specialist (MOS 8421). 2. Scope.

This course teaches the following; choosing the Marines who need a CRS interview and specifying the type of interview, researching the Marine’s performance history for eligibility and career options, meeting with the Marine and discussing career options, supporting the interview between Marine and CO, collecting endorsements for Marine’s retention request, creating and submitting retention requests, extensions, and contracts. 3. Applicability. This course is intended for instructional purposes only.

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This course is designed for Marine Corporals and above who are assigned formally or informally to perform duties of Career Retention Specialist (MOS 8421), with no experience and/or training for the job. The course is intended for Marines who perform this duty as a B billet and are not able to attend the formal school, or Marines who perform this duty as a primary billet and are delayed a year before they can attend the formal school. The course teaches the essential tasks of Career Retention Specialists in their first year on the job. 4. Recommendations.

Comments and recommendations on the contents of the course are invited and will aid in subsequent course revisions. Please complete the course evaluation questionnaire at the end of the final examination. Return the questionnaire and the examination booklet to your proctor. T. M. FRANUS By direction (This page intentionally left blank. ) MCI Course 0084 Table of Contents Page Contents………………………………………………………………………………………………………… Student Information …………………………………………………………………………………………

Study Guide…………………………………………………………………………………………………… Study Unit 1 Lesson 1 Lesson 2 Study Unit 2 Lesson 1 Lesson 2 Lesson 3 Lesson 4 Study Unit 3 Lesson 1 Lesson 2 Study Unit 4 Lesson 1 Lesson 2 Identify and Research……………………………………………………….. Identify and Contact Marines for Interviews…………………………. Research Marine’s Service History……………………………………… Interview…………………………………………………………………………

Common Elements of Interviews………………………………………… Initial Interview……………………………………………………………….. STAP, FTAP, EAS, and Unscheduled Interviews ………………….. Career Planning Contact Record…………………………………………. Commanding Officer’s Interview ……………………………………….. Preparing the Commanding Officer …………………………………….. Collecting Endorsements on a Route Sheet…………………………… Complete Contractual Agreement………………………………………..

Prepare and Submit RELM Requests…………………………………… Enlisted Extension and Reenlistment (DD Form 4)………………… i iii v 1-1 1-3 1-19 2-1 2-3 2-9 2-25 2-43 3-1 3-3 3-17 4-1 4-3 4-23 R-1 Review Lesson Examination …………………………………………………………………………….. MCI Course 0084 i (This page intentionally left blank. ) MCI Course 0084 Student Information Number and Title MCI 0084 Career Retention Specialist Study Hours 7 Course Materials Text MCI 0084 Handbook, Appendixes for Career Retention Specialist Review Agency MMEA-6, HQMC

Reserve Retirement Credits (RRC) 2 ACE Not applicable to civilian training/education Assistance For administrative assistance, have your training officer or NCO log on to the MCI home page at www. mci. usmc. mil. Marines CONUS may call toll free 1-800-MCI-USMC. Marines worldwide may call commercial (202) 6857596 or DSN 325-7596. MCI Course 0084 iii (This page intentionally left blank. ) MCI Course 0084 iv Study Guide Congratulations Congratulations on your enrollment in a distance education course from the Distance Learning and Technologies Department (DLTD) of the Marine Corps Institute (MCI).

Since 1920, the Marine Corps Institute has been helping tens of thousands of hard-charging Marines, like you, improve their technical job performance skills through distance learning. By enrolling in this course, you have shown a desire to improve the skills you have and master new skills to enhance your job performance. The distance learning course you have chosen, MCI 0084, Career Retention Specialist, provides instruction to Marine Corporals and above who are assigned formally or informally to perform duties of Career Retention Specialist (MOS 8421), with o experience and/or training for the job in their first year on the job. This course teaches the following; choosing the Marines who need a CRS interview and specifying the type of interview, researching the Marine’s performance history for eligibility and career options, meeting with the Marine and discussing career options, supporting the interview between Marine and CO, collecting endorsements for Marine’s retention request, creating and submitting retention requests, extensions, and contracts. • Your Personal Characteristics YOU ARE PROPERLY MOTIVATED.

You have made a positive decision to get training on your own. Self-motivation is perhaps the most important force in learning or achieving anything. Doing whatever is necessary to learn is motivation. You have it! YOU SEEK TO IMPROVE YOURSELF. You are enrolled to improve those skills you already possess, and to learn new skills. When you improve yourself, you improve the Corps! YOU HAVE THE INITIATIVE TO ACT. By acting on your own, you have shown you are a self-starter, willing to reach out for opportunities to learn and grow. YOU ACCEPT CHALLENGES.

You have self-confidence and believe in your ability to acquire knowledge and skills. You have the selfconfidence to set goals and the ability to achieve them, enabling you to meet every challenge. YOU ARE ABLE TO SET AND ACCOMPLISH PRACTICAL GOALS. You are willing to commit time, effort, and the resources necessary to set and accomplish your goals. These professional traits will help you successfully complete this distance learning course. Continued on next page • • • • MCI Course 0084 v Study Guide, Continued Beginning Your Course

Before you actually begin this course of study, read the student information page. If you find any course materials missing, notify your training officer or training NCO. If you have all the required materials, you are ready to begin. To begin your course of study, familiarize yourself with the structure of the course text. One way to do this is to read the table of contents. Notice the table of contents covers specific areas of study and the order in which they are presented. You will find the text divided into several study units.

Each study unit is comprised of two or more lessons, lesson exercises. Leafing Through the Text Leaf through the text and look at the course. Read a few lesson exercise questions to get an idea of the type of material in the course. If the course has additional study aids, such as a handbook or plotting board, familiarize yourself with them. The First Study Unit Turn to the first page of study unit 1. On this page, you will find an introduction to the study unit and generally the first study unit lesson. Study unit lessons contain learning objectives, lesson text, and exercises.

Reading the Learning Objectives Learning objectives describe in concise terms what the successful learner, you, will be able to do as a result of mastering the content of the lesson text. Read the objectives for each lesson and then read the lesson text. As you read the lesson text, make notes on the points you feel are important. Completing the Exercises To determine your mastery of the learning objectives and text, complete the exercises developed for you. Exercises are located at the end of each lesson, and at the end of each study unit.

Without referring to the text, complete the exercise questions and then check your responses against those provided. Continued on next page MCI Course 0084 vi Study Guide, Continued Continuing to March Continue on to the next lesson, repeating the above process until you have completed all lessons in the study unit. Follow the same procedures for each study unit in the course. Preparing for the Final Exam To prepare for your final exam, you must review what you learned in the course. The following suggestions will help make the review interesting and challenging. CHALLENGE YOURSELF. Try to recall the entire learning sequence without referring to the text. Can you do it? Now look back at the text to see if you have left anything out. This review should be interesting. Undoubtedly, you’ll find you were not able to recall everything. But with a little effort, you’ll be able to recall a great deal of the information. USE UNUSED MINUTES. Use your spare moments to review. Read your notes or a part of a study unit, rework exercise items, review again; you can do many of these things during the unused minutes of every day.

APPLY WHAT YOU HAVE LEARNED. It is always best to use the skill or knowledge you’ve learned as soon as possible. If it isn’t possible to actually use the skill or knowledge, at least try to imagine a situation in which you would apply this learning. For example make up and solve your own problems. Or, better still, make up and solve problems that use most of the elements of a study unit. USE THE “SHAKEDOWN CRUISE” TECHNIQUE. Ask another Marine to lend a hand by asking you questions about the course. Choose a particular study unit and let your buddy “fire away. This technique can be interesting and challenging for both of you! MAKE REVIEWS FUN AND BENEFICIAL. Reviews are good habits that enhance learning. They don’t have to be long and tedious. In fact, some learners find short reviews conducted more often prove more beneficial. Continued on next page • • • • MCI Course 0084 vii Study Guide, Continued Tackling the Final Exam When you have completed your study of the course material and are confident with the results attained on your study unit exercises, take the sealed envelope marked “FINAL EXAM” to your unit training NCO or training officer.

Your training NCO or officer will administer the final examination and return the examination and the answer sheet to MCI for grading. Before taking your final examination, read the directions on the DP-37 answer sheet carefully. Completing Your Course The sooner you complete your course, the sooner you can better yourself by applying what you’ve learned! HOWEVER–you do have 2 years from the date of enrollment to complete this course. Graduating! As a graduate of this distance education course and as a dedicated Marine, your job performance skills will improve, benefiting you, your unit, and the Marine Corps.

Semper Fidelis! MCI Course 0084 viii STUDY UNIT 1 IDENTIFY AND RESEARCH Overview Responsibilities A Career Retention Specialist (CRS) is responsible to the commander for administering the unit’s enlisted career retention program and is the commander’s advisor on enlisted retention matters. The primary purpose of the program is to reenlist first term Marines to meet career force MOS requirements, and reenlist qualified career Marines to sustain appropriate career force experience levels.

This study unit covers the following: • • • How to identify a list of names for Initial, FTAP, and EAS Interviews from a personnel roster. Contacting Marines to schedule an appointment. How to research a Marine’s service history for a CRS interview. Scope Career Planning Process The CRS follows a process while administering the career retention program. This career planning process begins with identifying Marines for retention interviews, and often ends with a completed contract. This course takes you through these milestones. The beginning of each study unit will indicate your location in the process.

Process Identify Contact Interview/Screen Description Choose the Marines who need an interview and specify the type of interview. Communicate with the Marine and arrange a scheduled interview. Research the Marine’s performance history and eligibility for career options. Meet with the Marine and discuss options. Support the interview between Marine and CO. Collect endorsements for Marine’s retention request. Create and submit retention requests, extensions, and contracts. Continued on next page CO Interview Recommend Contract MCI Course 0084 1-1 Study Unit 1 Overview, Continued What Is Covered

Looking at the Career Planning Process, this study unit takes the CRS through the first two milestones, Identify and Contact, and partially into the third milestone, Interview/Screen. This is where you are in the process: • • • • • • Identify? ? Contact? ? Interview/Screen? ? CO Interview Recommend Contract In This Study Unit This study unit contains the following lessons: Lesson Identify and Contact Marines for Interviews Research Marine’s Service History See Page 1-3 1-19 MCI Course 0084 1-2 Study Unit 1 LESSON 1 IDENTIFY AND CONTACT MARINES FOR INTERVIEWS Introduction Importance

The creation of four rosters, Initial, STAP, FTAP, and EAS interviews, serve as a guide for identifying and screening Marines. Make these rosters as accurate as possible so everyone is interviewed in a timely manner. This lesson will cover the following subjects: • • • Obtaining a personnel roster Identifying a list of names from the roster for various interviews Contacting Marines for scheduling appointments Scope Learning Objectives The learning objectives for this lesson are the following: • • • Recall the data that is needed from a personnel roster for compiling monthly interview rosters.

From a personnel roster, choose those Marines who need an interview and specify the type of interview they need. Recall the guidance for scheduling interview appointments. In This Lesson This lesson contains the following topics: Topic Introduction Obtain a Personnel Roster Distinguish First Term Marines from Career Marines Initial Interview STAP Interview FTAP Interview EAS Interview How to Identify a List of Names for Initial, STAP, FTAP, and EAS Interviews Contact Marines to Schedule an Appointment Lesson 1 Exercise See Page 1-3 1-4 1-5 1-7 1-9 1-10 1-11 1-12 1-13 1-16

MCI Course 0084 1-3 Study Unit 1, Lesson 1 Obtain a Personnel Roster Introduction The personnel roster is the tool for deciding which Marines need which types of interviews. This is one of the first actions in the process of interviewing and retaining Marines. Ensure the roster contains all the information needed for deciding which interviews should be done next month. Needed Information To identify which Marines require an interview from the personnel roster, you need the Marine’s name, rank, social security number (SSN), military occupational specialty (MOS) and date of rank (DOR).

In addition, get the following basic information for each Marine: • • • • • Armed Forces Active Duty Base Date (AFADBD) Present Unit Join Date (PUJD) End of Active Service (EAS) date Source of Entry code Marine’s platoon or work section Where to Get Administrative Databases If the CRS does not have access to the personnel databases within their office, see the administrative chief, or S-1 clerk, to request personnel rosters with all pertinent information necessary. MCI Course 0084 1-4 Study Unit 1, Lesson 1 Distinguish First Term Marines from Career Marines Introduction

You need to screen the roster and separate the population between Career Marines and First Term Marines. This topic shows how to quickly distinguish between the two on a personnel roster. How to Identify Locate the Source of Entry code on the Basic Individual Record (BIR) page, or on the personnel roster from the S-1 office administrative database. If the code begins with an “A,” the Marine is classified as First Term. If the code depicts a number (signifying the number of enlistment contracts the Marine’s been on), or a letter other than A, then the Marine is a Career Marine.

Note: Under the Prior Service Enlistment Program (PSEP) Marines may submit to come back into the Marine Corps. These Marines will often appear as Career Marines on the Source of Entry codes. If the CRS believes the Source of Entry code on the roster is incorrect in that particular Marine’s case, the record book will have to be reviewed to obtain a statement of service depicting when the Marine was on active duty and for how long. Illustration 1 The following is taken from a partial personnel roster. Notice that the first letter of the Source Entry code begins with an “A,” which denotes a First Term Marine.

NAME SMITH RANK E3 SSN 200560283 MOS 0311 DOR 20040701 AFADBD 20020618 Source Entry ADBA EAS 20060617 WORK 763-1413 Continued on next page MCI Course 0084 1-5 Study Unit 1, Lesson 1 Distinguish First Term Marines from Career Marines, Continued Illustration 2 The following is copied from a BIR showing a Career Marine with a Source of Entry code beginning with a number and/or a letter. Careerist on his 5th contract. Careerist on his 5th contract. Challenge Which of the following are First Term Marines, and which are Career Marines?

Name SMITH GREEN PEREZ CHANG MOUSAFFA BLACK Rank E4 E4 E6 E4 E9 E4 SSN 200310285 602113811 042665041 213995823 076780189 802786886 MOS 0311 1833 5831 3531 2891 0311 DOR 20040701 20030301 20030201 20030801 20030101 20040201 AFDBD 20020618 20000601 19960402 20001113 19781002 20020402 Source Entry ADBA ADBA 2BCA ADBA 6BCA ADBA EAS 20060509 20050234 20040567 20041891 20061234 20060456 Answers: First Term Marines: Smith, Green, Chang, Black Career Marines: Perez, Mousaffa MCI Course 0084 1-6 Study Unit 1, Lesson 1 Initial Interview Introduction

You need to conduct an initial interview of all First Term Marines who are within 6 months of present unit join date (PUJD) in accordance with MCO P1040. 31_, chapter 6, paragraph 6002. This topic explains how to create a list of those Marines from the personnel roster for next month’s interviews. The purpose of the interview includes the following: • • • Determine if a Marine meets all prerequisites for reenlistment/lateral move Ensure corrective action is initiated if necessary Ensure Marine is apprised of the benefits and incentives related to reenlistment How to Identify

To find the Marines from the personnel roster for an initial interview, do the following: Step 1 2 Action Screen and separate all First Term Marines from career Marines based on the Source of Entry code. Identify those First Term. Identify those First Term Marines who have joined the unit within the past 6 months of PUJD. Example: If today’s date is December 23, then CRS needs to include Marines with PUJD beginning 1 June. 2004/2005 May June July Aug Sept Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb March June is 6 months from December 3 Label the list containing these Marines: Initial Interview.

Continued on next page MCI Course 0084 1-7 Study Unit 1, Lesson 1 Initial Interview, Continued Challenge Assumption: The present time is the last week of the month: 25 May 2004. You are developing a list for next month’s interviews, June 2004. Plan the Initial Interview for the next month. Using a personnel roster from S-1, determine which Marines need an Initial Interview. NAME COOPER DAVIS GARCIA YONG PEREZ HARRIS ROGERS RANK E4 E5 E6 E4 E4 E9 E4 SSN 200310285 602113811 042665041 213995823 802786886 076780189 162745405 MOS 0311 1833 5831 3531 0311 2891 0151

DOR 20040701 20030301 20030201 20030801 20040201 20030101 20031001 AFADBD Source Entry 20020618 20000601 19960402 20001113 20020402 19781002 20010513 ADBA 2DBA BBCA ADBA ADBA 6BCA ADBA EAS 20060617 20050531 20050715 20041112 20060601 20061204 20050512 PUJD 20040325 20031212 20031001 20030902 20040226 20000915 20030905 Answer – Marines needing an Initial Interview (within 6 months of PUJD) are Cooper and Perez. 2003/2004 July Aug Sept Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar Apr May 6 months from today’s date, May 25 Perez Cooper MCI Course 0084 1-8 Study Unit 1, Lesson 1 STAP Interview Introduction

You must conduct a Subsequent Term Alignment Plan (STAP) interview of all Career Marines who are between 10 to 12 months from current EAS in accordance with MCO P1040. 31_, chapter 6, paragraph 6002. The STAP interview includes determination of reenlistment eligibility, and review of current career options and benefits. This topic explains how to create a list of those Marines from the personnel roster for next month’s interviews. How to Identify Do the following to identify Marines from the personnel roster for STAP: Step 1 2 Action Screen and separate all Marines based on the Source of Entry code.

Identify those that are careerist. Identify those Career Marines who are between 10 to 12 months of EAS. Example: Today’s date: 25May04. An EAS of 20040815 does not fall in the time period, but EAS 20050403 does fall in the time period 10-12 months from May 25, 2004. 20040815 20050403 2004/2005 May/Jun/Jul/Aug/Sept/Oct/Nov/Dec/Jan/Feb/Mar/Apr/May Today’s date 10 mos 12 mos Label the list containing these Marines as STAP Interview. 3 Challenge Assumption: The date is 25May04. While developing a list for next month’s interviews, June 2004, and using a personnel roster from S-1, determine the Marines that need a STAP Interview.

NAME DAVIS GARCIA YONG HARRIS PEREZ RANK E4 E6 E4 E9 E4 SSN 602113811 042665041 213995823 076780189 802786886 MOS 1833 5831 3531 2891 0311 DOR AFADBD Source Entry ADBA BBCA ADBA 6BCA ADBA EAS PUJD 20030301 20000601 20030201 19960402 20030801 20001113 20030101 19781002 20040201 20020402 20050531 20031212 20050430 20031001 20041112 20031202 20061204 20040226 20060601 20000915 Answer: Marines needing STAP Interview (between 10-12 months of EAS) are: Garcia (not Davis who is First Term). MCI Course 0084 1-9 Study Unit 1, Lesson 1 FTAP Interview Introduction

In accordance with MCO P1040. 31_, chapter 6, paragraph 6002, the CRS should conduct the First-Term Alignment Plan (FTAP) interview between 1 April and 1 July, prior to the fiscal year in which the First Term Marine is eligible to reenlist and in which their EAS occurs. The FTAP interview includes a discussion of career options and the benefits of a Marine Corps career. This topic explains how to identify these Marines from the personnel roster. A fiscal year is the governmental accounting period of 12 months that runs from 1 October through 31 September.

To find the Marines from the personnel roster for FTAP interview, do the following: Step 1 Action Choose from the personnel roster those First Term Marines with an EAS in the next fiscal year and who are eligible for reenlistment. Fiscal Year How to Identify Mar/Apr/May/Jun/Jul/Aug/Sep/Oct/Nov/Dec/Jan/Feb/Mar/Apr… eligible, First Term Marines with EAS 1 Oct through 31 Sept Label this list as FTAP Interviews. Conduct these interviews only between 1 April and 1 July. Interview period 2 3 Challenge Assumption: The present time is the last week of the month: 25 May 2004. You are developing a list for next month’s interviews, June 2004.

You are planning your FTAP interviews. Using your personnel roster from S-1, determine which Marines need an FTAP interview. NAME COOPER DAVIS GARCIA YONG RANK E4 E4 E6 E4 SSN 200310285 602113811 042665041 213995823 MOS 0311 1833 5831 3531 DOR 20040701 20030301 20030201 20030801 AFADBD 20020618 20000601 19960402 20001113 Source Entry ADBA ADBA BBCA ADBA EAS PUJD 20051217 20040325 20050531 20031212 20050715 20031001 20041112 20031202 Answer: The Marines needing a FTAP interview are Davis and Yong. (Not Garcia because he is not First Term). MCI Course 0084 1-10 Study Unit 1, Lesson 1 EAS Interview

Introduction MCO P1040. 31_, chapter 6, paragraph 6002, explains that the CRS needs to conduct Expiration of Active Service (EAS) interviews for Marines who are between 6 and 9 months from their EAS or prior to transfer for separation. The interview includes an explanation of benefits for joining the Selected Marine Corps Reserve and Transition Assistance Management Programs, and the Marine’s requirement to attend a pre-separation brief. This topic explains how to create the list from the personnel roster. After creating the list, you have a reference for contacting and scheduling Marines for interviews.

How to Identify To find the Marines from the personnel roster for an EAS interview, do the following: Step 1 Action Choose from the personnel roster those Marines with an EAS within the 6 to 9 month window of time from the current date. Non-example: 20041205 Example: 20050510 (within window) Aug/Sep/Oct/Nov/Dec/Jan/Feb/Mar/Apr/May/Jun/Jul/Aug/Sep Current date Label this list EAS Interviews. 6 mos 9 mos 2 Challenge You are planning EAS interviews for the upcoming month. Using your personnel roster from S-1, determine which Marines need an EAS interview next month. (Today’s date is 25 October 2004. NAME COOPER DAVIS GARCIA YONG HARRIS PEREZ ROGERS RANK E4 E4 E6 E4 E9 E4 E4 SSN 200310285 602113811 042665041 213995823 076780189 802786886 162745405 MOS 0311 1833 5831 3531 2891 0311 0151 DOR 20040701 20030301 20030201 20030801 20030101 20040201 20031001 AFADBD 20020618 20000601 19960402 20001113 19781002 20020402 20000713 Source Entry ADBA ADBA BBCA ADBA 6BCA ADBA ADBA EAS 20060617 20050531 20041115 20041112 20061204 20060601 20050512 WORK 763-1413 763-7318 763-3118 763-4265 763-7767 763-3854 763-9104 Answer: The Marines requiring an EAS interview next month are Davis and Rogers.

Garcia and Yong are incorrect answers because they were interviewed in May, 2004 (6 months from their EAS). MCI Course 0084 1-11 Study Unit 1, Lesson 1 How to Identify a List of Names for Initial, STAP, FTAP, and EAS Interviews Introduction The previous topics showed you how to compute time periods and identify Marines for the four CRS interviews, and also about basic information needed from a personnel roster. This next topic shows how all this information is used in sequence to generate four lists of names for interviews. You will use these lists later to contact the Marines for the interviews. When to Create List

You create these lists towards the end of every month for the beginning of the next month. Importance Use the lists as a reference for contacting the Marines for next month’s interviews. Also, use the lists for starting research on each Marine in preparation for their interview. Procedure This table describes how the CRS identifies separate lists of names of Marines for initial, STAP, FTAP, and EAS interviews. Step 1 2 3 4 5 Action Obtain a personnel roster from an administrative database. Identify all Marines on the list who need their initial interview for next month and create a separate list of them.

Identify all Marines on the list who need their STAP interview for next month and create a separate list of them. Identify all Marines on the list who need an FTAP interview for next month and create a separate list of them. Identify all Marines on the list who need an EAS interview for next month and create a separate list of them. MCI Course 0084 1-12 Study Unit 1, Lesson 1 Contact Marines to Schedule an Appointment Introduction With the four lists of required interviews, you should contact each Marine and schedule an appointment. You need to schedule appointments every month.

This topic provides guidance in choosing how to contact each Marine. Every month. When to Schedule Guidance The following is some guidance when scheduling appointments. • • Ensure that you mutually agree to an appointed time and place. Maximize person-to-person time with Marines to establish early rapport, elicit commitment, and efficiently set dates and times for meetings. Procedure The table below describes how to contact Marines to schedule an appointment. Step 1 Action From the list of names you need to contact for an appointment, choose a Marine and identify the Marine’s platoon, section, or department.

Mutually agree with the Marine to meet at an appointed time and location. When communicating, maximize person-to-person contact by meeting in person (best) or over the phone. Accurately note Marine’s name, location, the date of appointment, and time in your schedule book. Repeat steps 1-3 until you have scheduled an appointment with all names on the list. 2 3 4 Challenge 1 You are the CRS for 2nd Bn, 7th Marines. Today is 25 Jul 04 and you must arrange appointments for all Marines who require an interview. You attempt to contact PFC Binotz who is a member of 1st Platoon, Golf Company.

He is currently at the rifle range until 8 Aug 04. What is the best way to contact him? a. b. c. d. Go find him at the range. Leave a phone message for him at Golf Company HQ. Send him an E-mail. Leave his platoon commander a phone message and E-mail. Continued on next page MCI Course 0084 1-13 Study Unit 1, Lesson 1 Contact Marines to Schedule an Appointment, Continued Feedback to Challenge 1 Quality of Answer Best Choices a. Go find him at the range. Reason This will help to develop a rapport and communicate directly with PFC Binotz. One visit sets the appointment and gets a commitment.

Messages are easily lost. There is no incentive for PFC Binotz to return your phone message. Although the message goes directly to PFC Binotz and allows him time to review and answer at any time, he may, however, be distracted or forgetful in returning the message, and coordinating mutually convenient dates may be prolonged. Not all Marines have E-mail access or E-mail accounts. Coordinating with the chain of command minimizes friction and schedule conflicts. However, it could prolong your efforts to schedule a meeting. Poor Poor b. Leave phone message for him at Golf Company HQ. c. Send him an Email.

Good d. Leave his platoon commander a phone message and E-mail. Challenge 2 You meet with PFC Binotz to schedule an appointment. He enthusiastically commits himself to meet with you in your office sometime early next week in the morning. Have you scheduled an appointment? a. b. c. d. Yes. Marine appears to be committed. No. There is no mutually agreed time and date. Yes. The appointment is set for the morning on Monday or Tuesday. No. Despite his enthusiasm, he is evading a commitment. Continued on next page MCI Course 0084 1-14 Study Unit 1, Lesson 1 Contact Marines to Schedule an Appointment, Continued

Feedback to Challenge 2 Quality of Answer Good Choices a. Yes. Marine appears to be committed. Reason Although PFC Binotz most likely will report as he stated, other emerging priorities may cause him to break the appointment because he felt there was no specific date and time. Best Fair b. No. There is no mutually agreed time and date. c. Yes. The appointment is set for the morning on Monday or Tuesday. d. No. Despite his enthusiasm, he is evading a commitment. Fair There is considerable latitude for deciding when to report, and for other priorities to take precedent.

PFC Binotz may feel the time period is too open to expect a firm commitment. Although PFC Binotz did not agree to a specific time and date, there is not enough information to indicate he is evading a commitment. There could be other reasons. MCI Course 0084 1-15 Study Unit 1, Lesson 1 Lesson 1 Exercise Directions Answer the following items. Check your answers against the correct answers at the end of this lesson. If you have any questions, refer to the reference page listed for each item. Item 1 Where would you go to pull a personnel roster if the CRS does not have access to a personnel database? . b. c. d. S-1 S-3 Internet Regimental HQ Item 2 Besides name, rank and SSN, what other basic information do you need on a personnel roster to identify Marines for CRS interviews? a. b. c. d. ASVAB Scores AFADBD Anniversary date Pro and Con Marks Item 3 Which of the following codes denotes a First Term Marine under “Source of Entry” codes? a. b. c. d. 1TDA 2BEA BAAA ABDA Item 4 Which of the following is guidance for scheduling interview appointments with a Marine? a. b. c. d. Ensure you mutually agree to an appointed time and place. Schedule through the S-1.

Arrange through the Marine’s immediate supervisor. Coordinate with all members of the Marine’s chain of command. Continued on next page MCI Course 0084 1-16 Study Unit 1, Lesson 1 Exercise Lesson 1 Exercise, Continued Answers The table below provides the correct answers to the exercise items. If you have any questions, refer to the reference page. Item Number 1 2 3 4 Answer a b d a Reference Page 1-4 1-4 1-5 1-13 Lesson Summary This lesson covered how to obtain a personnel roster, identify a list of names from the roster for Initial, STAP, FTAP, and EAS interviews, and ontact Marines for scheduling appointments. Some important learning points to remember include the following: • When creating a personnel roster to decide who needs an interview, include Present Unit Join Date (PUJD), End of Active Service (EAS) date, and Source of Entry code. Read Source of Entry codes to distinguish First Term from Career Marines. Those that begin with an “A” denote First Term Marines. All other codes denote Career Marines. Schedule initial interviews for all First Term Marines who are within 6 months of present unit join date (PUJD).

Schedule (STAP) interviews of all Career Marines who are between 10 to 12 months from current EAS. Schedule (FTAP) interviews between 1 April and 1 July, prior to the fiscal year in which the first term Marine is eligible to reenlist and in which their EAS occurs. Schedule (EAS) interviews for Marines who are between 6 and 9 months from their EAS. • • • • • The next lesson instructs how to research a Marine’s service history and how to screen for reenlistment qualifiers and prerequisites. MCI Course 0084 1-17 Study Unit 1, Lesson 1 Exercise (This page intentionally left blank. )

MCI Course 0084 1-18 Study Unit 1, Lesson 1 Exercise LESSON 2 RESEARCH MARINE’S SERVICE HISTORY Introduction Scope The last lesson explained how to develop different lists of Marines who require interviews. This lesson explains the next step of researching the Marine’s background. This lesson covers references that list reenlistment prerequisites, how and where to get Marines’ background data, and how to review the sources for data. Importance Research the Marine’s history before interviewing the Marine. You will learn if the Marine is qualified for reenlistment and any special programs.

After completing this research, you will know more about the Marine you are interviewing and be better prepared to answer the Marine’s questions. Learning Objectives The learning objectives for this lesson are the following: • • • • • Recall sources of data for researching Marine’s service history. Recall where to find a specific positive characteristic from either the Basic Training Record (BTR) or Basic Information Record (BIR). Recall the definition of a discrepancy in a Marine’s service record book. Recall the importance of researching a Marine’s service history.

Using MCO P1040. 31_ and given entries from a Marine’s record book, decide if anything in the Marine’s record prevents the Marine from reenlisting. Continued on next page MCI Course 0084 1-19 Study Unit 1, Lesson 2 Introduction, Continued In this Lesson This lesson contains the following topics: Topic Introduction Sources of Data Discrepancies Unit Punishment Book Reenlistment Prerequisites and Disqualifiers How to Use the Research Lesson 2 Exercise See Page 1-19 1-21 1-27 1-29 1-31 1-34 1-35 MCI Course 0084 1-20 Study Unit 1, Lesson 2 Sources of Data Introduction

After contacting the Marine and before the interview, research the Marine’s service history for any information that may influence the reenlistment decision. If there are any factors preventing the Marine from reenlisting, identify them and discuss them with the Marine at the interview. This topic describes sources that provide the service history data on a Marine. Importance You may uncover information on the Marine that sends you looking into chapter 4 of MCO P1040. 31_, Enlisted Career Planning and Retention Manual, for information about reenlistment prerequisites, disqualifiers, and waivers.

Where to Get Data Get data from the following sources: • The unit’s administration office holds the Marine’s Service Record Book (SRB). The following are examples: • • • • IPAC (Marine Corps Base) GPAC (Group, MAG) DPAC (Division) The unit diary Marine Corps Total Force System (MCTFS) is directly linked to the Reenlistment Extension Lateral Move (RELM) database, which contains training and personal data in electronic format, including the BIR and BTR. The 3270/MCTFS contains the Record of Service (ROS) electronic database. Manpower Management Support Branch (MMSB) Web site contains Fitness report data.

Continued on next page • • MCI Course 0084 1-21 Study Unit 1, Lesson 2 Sources of Data, Continued What Data to Get Search for the following data: • In the Administrative remarks section in the Marine’s SRB, look for negative comments, for example, unauthorized absence, disrespect, and disorderly conduct. Look for incidents involving controlled substances, permanent dependencies/hardships, or CMC imposed reenlistment restriction. (An illustration will appear later in this lesson. ) Look for any NJPs on the NAVMC 10132 (Unit Punishment Book/UPB) pages. Look for a Page 13 entry for courts-martial convictions.

On the Internet at www. mmsb. usmc. mil, get fitness report data. Look for gaps in reporting periods. Find the following using 3270/MCTFS: • BIR: Pay Entry Base Date (PEBD), AFADBD, EAS, End of Current Contract (ECC), Source of Entry Code, Pay Grade. • BTR: Pistol and rifle scores, physical fitness qualification, and compliance with military appearance/height/weight/body fat standards. • • • TEST screen with ASVAB test score data. Education Page (TEDU) with formal schools data. In the ROS, get average Proficiency and Conduct marks. • • • • Include Positive Characteristics

When gathering data, include positive characteristics that may influence the Marine’s decision to reenlist. Examples include the following: • • • • • Pistol and rifle scores Date of rank Physical Fitness Test ASVAB line scores Formal schools Continued on next page MCI Course 0084 1-22 Study Unit 1, Lesson 2 Sources of Data, Continued BIR Illustration The following is an example of enlistment information from a Marine’s BIR. BTR Illustration The following is an example of PFT/weight control/military appearance information from a Marine’s BTR. Continued on next page MCI Course 0084 -23 Study Unit 1, Lesson 2 Sources of Data, Continued ROS Illustration The following is an example of average proficiency and conduct marks information from a Marine’s ROS. TEST Page Illustration The following is an example of ASVAB test score information from a Marine’s TEST Page. Continued on next page MCI Course 0084 1-24 Study Unit 1, Lesson 2 Sources of Data, Continued MMSB Website Illustration The following is an example of Fitness Report information from www. MMSB. usmc. mil. Continued on next page MCI Course 0084 1-25 Study Unit 1, Lesson 2 Sources of Data, Continued

Challenge 1 You must research LCpl Torres’ training and personal data for a scheduled interview with him tomorrow. Of the following, where would his Service Record Book most likely be located? a. b. c. d. IPAC S-1, Regiment S-1, Battalion G-1, Marine Division Answer: a. IPAC, a consolidated personnel administrative unit, holds Service Record Books for all personnel assigned to his company. Challenge 2 What database contains training and personal data (including BIR and BTR)? a. Unit diary (MCTFS) b. TFRS c. MMSB Answer: a. Unit diary (MCTFS). (The others contain fitness report data. Challenge 3 Where would you go to find Record of Service? a. b. c. d. BIR 3270/MCTFS MMSB TFRS Answer: b. 3270/MCTFS. (This is the only location from the alternatives that contain the Record of Service. ) Challenge 4 A Marine’s source entry code is found in the a. b. c. d. BIR. BTR. Page 11. SGLI. Answer: a. BIR MCI Course 0084 1-26 Study Unit 1, Lesson 2 Discrepancies Introduction While reviewing a Marine’s record book, you may discover a discrepancy that is not supported with other information. This should be researched before the interview. Explanation

A discrepancy is a derogatory comment on the administrative remarks section in the Service Record Book that is not supported with anything in the Unit Punishment Book (NAVMC 10132 page). Importance The derogatory comment could have been for an UCMJ violation. NonJudicial Punishments (NJPs) affect a Marine’s ability to reenlist and prevent entry into some programs. Location of Derogatory Comment Instead of NJP, the command could have decided to document the violation with only a page 11 entry (administrative remarks) in the Service Record Book. Continued on next page MCI Course 0084 1-27 Study Unit 1, Lesson 2

Discrepancies, Continued Derogatory Comment Example Some examples of UCMJ violations that the command may choose to list as derogatory comments instead of an NJP include the following: • Disorderly conduct • Unauthorized absence • Disrespect The following is an example of a page 11 entry. What to Do The CRS must check to see if there is an NJP related to the administrative remark. The following table explains what to do. If there is a related NJP, then… Review chapter 4 of MCO P1040. 31_, Enlisted Career Planning and Retention Manual, for information about how the NJP affects reenlistment prerequisites, disqualifiers, and waivers.

If there is no evidence of a related NJP, then… Ask the Marine at the interview about the discrepancy and what happened. MCI Course 0084 1-28 Study Unit 1, Lesson 2 Unit Punishment Book Introduction While continuing to review the Marine’s service history in preparation for the interview, review the Unit Punishment Book (UPB), also known as NAVMC 10132 page. If a Marine received any NJPs and/or court-martials, they are located on the UPB. Importance NJPs and court-martials affect a Marine’s ability to reenlist and prevent entry into some programs. Where to Locate and Access

The UPB is located in a database known as “3270,” and is accessible through the Internet. The point of contact for accessing the UPB is the administrative chief for the Marine’s unit. What to Do Look for any NJPs and court-martials for the Marine that may be listed on this page. If you find any, look into Chapter 4 of MCO P1040. 31_, Enlisted Career Planning and Retention Manual, for information about how the NJP/court-martial affects reenlistment prerequisites, disqualifiers, and waivers. Example An example follows on the next page. Continued on next page MCI Course 0084 1-29 Study Unit 1, Lesson 2 Unit Punishment Book, Continued

MCI Course 0084 1-30 Study Unit 1, Lesson 2 Reenlistment Prerequisites and Disqualifiers Introduction Reenlistment prerequisites and disqualifiers give the criteria for measuring a Marine’s ability to reenlist. After reviewing a Marine’s service history, you will compare the Marine’s background with the reenlistment prerequisites and disqualifiers. Importance There will be factors in each Marine’s record that affect the Marine’s decision to reenlist. By researching the Marine’s background for these factors, and reading the reenlistment prerequisites, you can prepare in advance for the Marine’s questions during the interview.

Using the reference saves time in identifying and summarizing a Marine’s reenlistment options. Preparation will make you feel more comfortable and add to your credibility during the interview. Location of Reference Chapter 4 of MCO P1040. 31_, Enlisted Career Planning and Retention Manual, provides information for reenlistment prerequisites, disqualifiers, and waivers. This information is also provided as Appendix A in this MCI. The most current orders are downloadable from the official Marine Corps Web site www. usmc. mil, under Publications. Chapter 4, MCO P1040. 31_ Chapter 4 is entitled Reenlistment and Extension of Enlistment.

The chapter includes the following paragraphs: • Reenlistment Prerequisites • Basic Reenlistment Prerequisites • First Term Marines • Career Marines • Waiver of Reenlistment Prerequisites Continued on next page MCI Course 0084 1-31 Study Unit 1, Lesson 2 Reenlistment Prerequisites and Disqualifiers, Continued Examples in Research Become familiar with using MCO P1040. 31_. After reviewing a Marine’s Service Record Book, you will use the reference to answer questions about the Marine’s reenlistment eligibility. Some common questions and answers include the following: Question: Answer The Marine enlisted without a high school egree. Can he or she reenlist without one? No. He or she must acquire a high school degree or an alternate credential before reenlistment (paragraph 4103, First Term Marines). Are there minimum conduct and proficiency mark averages that a Marine must achieve before reenlistment? Yes. Minimum scores are 4. 0/4. 0 (paragraph 4103, Basic Reenlistment Prerequisites). Can the Marine request a waiver for Pro/Con marks less than 4. 0/4. 0? No (paragraph 4105, Waiver of Reenlistment Prerequisites). Question: Answer: Question: Answer: Challenges Use either your own copy of chapter 4, MCO P1040. 1_, or the reference information provided in Appendix A of the MCI 0084 Handbook, to practice using the reference to answer the following questions. Compare your answers with feedback on the next page. 1. Can a Marine reenlist if she has any non-judicial punishments? If so, how many? Answer: _______________________ (paragraph? ____________) 2. Can a Marine request a waiver for reenlistment if found guilty of DUI/DWI? Answer: _______________________ (paragraph? ____________) 3. Can an HIV positive Marine reenlist? Answer: _______________________ (paragraph? ____________) 4.

A Marine was convicted in a Japanese court, and fined the equivalent of $600. Can the Marine reenlist? Answer: _______________________ (paragraph? ____________) Continued on next page MCI Course 0084 1-32 Study Unit 1, Lesson 2 Reenlistment Prerequisites and Disqualifiers, Continued Feedback to Challenges Check your answers with the correct answers. 1. Can a Marine reenlist if she has any non-judicial punishments? If so, how many? Answer: Yes, but no more than 2 NJPs (paragraph: 4103, Basic Reenlistment Prerequisites). 2. Can a Marine request a waiver for reenlistment if found guilty of DUI/DWI?

Answer: Yes (paragraph 4105, Waiver of Reenlistment Prerequisites). 3. Can an HIV positive Marine reenlist? Answer: Yes (excluded from requirement to be worldwide deployable) (paragraph: 4103, Basic Reenlistment Prerequisites). 4. A Marine was convicted in a Japanese court, and fined the equivalent of $600. Can the Marine reenlist? Answer: No (but can request a waiver) (paragraph 4103, Basic Reenlistment Prerequisites). MCI Course 0084 1-33 Study Unit 1, Lesson 2 How To Use The Research Introduction The previous topics showed how to research individual data sources for a Marine’s service history.

This next topic shows how all this information from the previous topics is used in a sequence to prepare for the Marine’s interview. When to Do It Between the time of scheduling the Marine for an interview and interviewing the Marine, research the Marine’s service history. Importance Researching the Marine’s service history accomplishes the following: • • • • Prepares you in advance for the Marine’s questions during the interview Saves time in identifying and summarizing a Marine’s reenlistment options Makes the Marine and CRS feel more comfortable during the interview Adds to your credibility during the interview

Procedure The following lists the procedures for researching a Marine’s service history. Step 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Action Retrieve Marine’s Service Record Book. Pull data from an administrative database about the Marine’s basic individual record (BIR), and basic training record (BTR). Gather Marine’s training and personal data from MCTFS/RELM database. Look for positive characteristics in Marine’s Service Record Book. Look for discrepancies, NJPs, and court-martials. Compare Marine’s background with reenlistment prerequisites and disqualifiers.

Print data and keep as a reference when interviewing Marine. MCI Course 0084 1-34 Study Unit 1, Lesson 2 Lesson 2 Exercise Directions Answer the following items. Check your answers against the correct answers at the end of this lesson. If you have any questions, refer to the reference page listed for each item. Item 1 Which of the following is a source of data for researching Marine’s service history? a. b. c. d. 3270/MCTFS CPAC/SR71 DLTD/MCIAIS RELQ/1700V Item 2 Where would you go to find if a Marine received NJP? a. b. c. d. Page 3 of SRB UPB Internet Page 13 Item 3

On what 3270 page would you find a Marine’s current PFT score? a. b. c. d. BIR TEST TEDU BTR Item 4 Which of the following is a definition of a discrepancy in a Marine’s service record book? a. b. c. d. Derogatory comment not supported by a NAVMC 10132 page A comment at variance with other stated facts Disparaging entry that is documented on SRB page 11 entry Statement supported with UPB (NAVMC 10132 page) Continued on next page MCI Course 0084 1-35 Study Unit 1, Lesson 2 Exercise Lesson 2 Exercise, Continued Item 5 Why is it important to research a Marine’s service history? a. b. c. d.

Prepares you in advance for Marine’s questions during the interview Allows you to interrogate Marine more effectively Enhances CRS authority during the interview Helps you hold Marine accountable for his interview comments Item 6 Select from below the disqualifying factor for reenlistment. You may use the reference information provided as Appendix A in this MCI from chapter 4, MCO P1040. 31_ a. b. c. d. A Marine with 2 NJPs Break in active duty service Proficiency marks of 3. 9 GT of 80 Continued on next page MCI Course 0084 1-36 Study Unit 1, Lesson 2 Exercise Lesson 2 Exercise, Continued Answers

The table below provides the correct answers to the exercise items. If you have any questions, refer to the reference page listed for each item. Item Number 1 2 3 4 5 6 Answer a b d a a c Reference Page 1-21 1-22 and 1-29 1-22 1-27 1-34 A-2 Lesson Summary The previous lesson explained how to identify and contact Marines for interviews. This lesson explained how to research the background of Marines you scheduled for career retention interviews. The lesson covered references that list reenlistment prerequisites, included how and where to get Marines’ background data, and also covered how to review the sources for data.

This lesson instructed how to determine who is reenlistment eligible and who is disqualified from the prerequisites for reenlistment. After completing this research, you should know more about the Marine you will interview, and should be more prepared to answer the Marine’s questions at the interview. What’s Next Researching the Marine’s service history is necessary preparation for the next step, the interview with the Marine. The next instructional segment teaches how to interview. MCI Course 0084 1-37 Study Unit 1, Lesson 2 Exercise (This page intentionally left blank. ) MCI Course 0084 1-38

Study Unit 1, Lesson 2 Exercise STUDY UNIT 2 INTERVIEW Overview Scope The last study unit provided guidance in identifying Marines who need interviews in your command, performing research and scheduling Marines for interviews. This study unit takes the next step in the process: conducting different types of interviews. Later study units explain what to do after the interview. The interview is the most important tool for helping Marines make career decisions. No matter the type of interview the Marine needs, he/she will benefit if the CRS plans and prepares for the interview. Career Planning Process

Looking at the Career Planning Process, this study unit takes the CRS through the Interview/Screen milestone. This is where you are in the process • • • • • • Identify Contact Interview/Screen? ? CO Interview Recommend Contract In This Study Unit This study unit contains the following lessons: Lesson Common Elements of Interviews Initial Interview STAP, FTAP, EAS and Unscheduled Interviews Career Planning Contact Record See Page 2-3 2-9 2-27 2-47 MCI Course 0084 2-1 Study Unit 2 (This page intentionally left blank. ) MCI Course 0084 2-2 Study Unit 2 LESSON 1 COMMON ELEMENTS OF INTERVIEWS Introduction Scope

This lesson teaches students the elements that are common to all interviews. Later lessons will explain additional elements and procedures that are unique to specific interview types. For every interview, the CRS uses the information gathered in research (explained in study unit 1) to conduct a thorough interview. Also common to all interviews, the CRS establishes a rapport and an atmosphere that helps the Marine talk about needs and desires. Importance The common elements of a well-conducted interview afford each Marine the opportunity to gather information and make a sound decision about their career.

Learning Objectives The learning objectives for this lesson are the following: • Recall the guidelines and characteristics for establishing rapport at a CRS interview. • Recall the procedures that are common to all good interviews. In This Lesson This lesson contains the following topics: Topic Introduction Establish Rapport Common Procedures In An Interview Lesson 1 Exercise See Page 2-3 2-4 2-5 2-6 MCI Course 0084 2-3 Study Unit 2, Lesson 1 Establish Rapport Introduction The most important aspect of the interview is to establish rapport.

Knowing the Marine and his/her background provides information that helps establish a working relationship that will foster understanding and communication. This topic explains how to establish rapport. Guidelines Some guidelines for establishing rapport include the following: • Use the CRS office for interviews. It is probably the best location because it provides a controlled environment that is conducive to mentoring and confidentiality. The CRS can create a warm and personal atmosphere. • Get up from behind your desk to greet the Marine. • Establish rapport through communication. • Talk to the Marine’s level of understanding.

Discuss options using terms and language so that the Marine understands how they relate to the Marine’s situation. • Allow the Marine to control the discussion topics. • Develop awareness for the Marine’s needs and desires. • Put the Marine at ease. • Make the Marine comfortable in discussing his or her options. • Anticipate and have information ready to meet the Marine’s needs. • Schedule a follow-up interview. • Ensure the Marine leaves interview on a positive note. Interview Characteristics You build rapport if the interview includes these characteristics: • • Comfortable environment Positive discussion

MCI Course 0084 2-4 Study Unit 2, Lesson 1 Common Procedures In An Interview Introduction The previous topic gave guidelines and a description of how rapport is established in the interview. This next topic shows how guidelines for building rapport are included in common procedures for conducting any interview. For specific types of interviews, there are additional procedural steps, and these are explained in the following lessons. Procedures This table gives a general description of common procedures in conducting a CRS interview. Step Action 1 At scheduled interview, get up from behind the desk to greet the Marine. Establish rapport with the Marine through dialogue to make feel comfortable. 3 Explain the purpose of the interview. 4 Explain to the Marine there are possible discussion topics, but the Marine can lead discussion where he or she wants to go. 5 At the end, invite them to come back at any time if there are additional questions. 6 7 Leave the Marine with a positive impression. Follow-up by correcting any discrepancies found in records, if needed. MCI Course 0084 2-5 Study Unit 2, Lesson 1 Lesson 1 Exercise Directions Answer the following items.

Check your answers against the correct answers at the end of this lesson. If you have any questions, refer to the reference page listed for each item. Item 1 Where is the best location to conduct the interview? a. b. c. d. Marine’s work section Chow hall CRS office Sergeant Major’s office Item 2 Which of the following procedures is common to all good interviews? a. b. c. d. Brief Marine on the Lateral Move Program. Explain the FTAP submission schedule. Invite Marine to come back at any time. Explain the need to review service history. Continued on next page MCI Course 0084 2-6

Study Unit 2, Lesson 1 Exercise Lesson 1 Exercise, Continued Answers The table below provides the correct answers to the exercise items. If you have any questions, refer to the reference page listed for each item. Item Number 1 2 Answer c c Reference Page 2-4 2-5 Lesson Summary This lesson included the following key points: • Guidelines in establishing rapport include getting up from behind desk to greet Marine and talking to the Marine’s level of understanding. • Procedures common to all interviews include explaining the interview purpose and allowing Marine to lead discussion. What’s Next

This lesson taught elements and procedures that are common to all interviews. The next lesson explains the Initial Interview. There are additional elements and procedures unique to the Initial Interview. MCI Course 0084 2-7 Study Unit 2, Lesson 1 Exercise (This page intentionally left blank. ) MCI Course 0084 2-8 Study Unit 2, Lesson 1 Exercise LESSON 2 INITIAL INTERVIEW Introduction Scope This lesson covers the procedures for an initial interview with a first term Marine. In previous lessons you learned the different types of interviews and the common elements/procedures for any interview.

This lesson builds on the previous lessons by including those programs and assignment options you must explain in your initial interview. This lesson summarizes where to go for information and what to do. Following lessons explain other types of interviews, their content, and specialized procedures. Purpose The purpose of the initial interview is to familiarize the Marine with Marine Corps career and benefits. The CRS explains the benefits and incentives related to reenlistment/lateral move, and determines if the Marine meets the qualifications.

Learning Objectives The learning objectives for this lesson are the following: • • • • • • • • Recall the purpose for a given CRS interview. Recall the description of the Selective Reenlistment Bonus Program. Recall the information that the CRS must explain to a Marine about the Selective Reenlistment Bonus Program at the initial interview. Recall the documents required to process requests for a SRBP payment. Calculate any bonus multiples a Marine could receive for the Selective Reenlistment Bonus Program (SRBP). Recall the description of the Lateral Move Program.

Analyze excerpts from MCO 1220. 5_ or MCO 1200. 7_ for answers to Marines’ questions about the Lateral Move Program. Recall the description of the Special Duty Assignment Program. Continued on next page MCI Course 0084 2-9 Study Unit 2, Lesson 2 Introduction, Continued Learning Objectives, continued • • • • • • Analyze excerpts from MCO 1326. 6_, MCO 1300. 2_, or MCO 1306. 2 for answers to Marines’ questions about Special Duty Assignments. Recall the guidelines to give Marines about duty station preferences in their initial CRS interview.

Recall the definition of “boatspace. ” Recall the significance of “boatspace” to reenlistment. Calculate the boatspace availability for a specific MOS from a FY-2005 Boat Space Report excerpt. Recall the time period for conducting First Term Alignment Plan (FTAP) interviews. In This Lesson This lesson contains the following topics: Topic Introduction Selective Reenlistment Bonus Program Lateral Move Program Special Duty Assignments Duty Station Preferences FTAP Procedures For An Initial Interview Lesson 2 Exercise See Page 2-9 2-11 2-13 2-15 2-17 2-18 2-20 2-21

MCI Course 0084 2-10 Study Unit 2, Lesson 2 Selective Reenlistment Bonus Program Introduction The Selective Reenlistment Bonus Program (SRBP) is an incentive program to supplement reenlistments and lateral moves throughout the armed forces. This topic explains what the CRS should present to the Marine about SRBP during the initial interview. The rest of this lesson explains what the CRS should present to the Marine about other topics during the initial interview. Description

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