Dramatic Irony in Oedipus Rex assignment

Dramatic Irony in Oedipus Rex assignment Words: 398

Oedipus himself was the “child of endless night”, the “sightless, witless, senseless” man. His own sight blinded him Of the truth, which had been told to him in more than one way. He decided not to listen to the truth, but rather seek it out himself. Another noticeable point of irony in this story grows from Croon, Oedipus brother-in-law (or uncle if you prefer). Early in the story, Oedipus charges Croon and Terrains with treason. His blindness again doesn’t allow him to see that Croon and Terrains are merely trying to help him.

Croon tells Oedipus that he has no intentions of being king. He is happy ruling next to Oedipus, without all the headaches that come along with absolute power. Croon is happy being the main advisor, instead of being the king himself. At the beginning of Scene II, Croon addresses the people of Thebes, telling them of Oedipus accusation towards him yet he is of no harm to Oedipus. After clearly stating that he did not want the throne, once Oedipus blinds himself, Croon rapidly picks up the position of king, and immediately begins to rule.

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If Croon was so uninterested in the throne, why, then, does he accept it so quickly? Throughout the entire play, the irony helps the audience to accept Oedipus cruel fate without seeing him as less of a hero. Because he so unknowingly chose not to listen to reason; because of his ignorant accusations and insults, in a way, the audience feels pity for him. He has, in no intention, brought this upon himself. Just as he blinded himself with Costar’s brooch, he drove himself towards the emotional pain and suffering e is going through at the end of the play.

For this reason, although he slept with his mother, accused the wrong people, and so wrongfully judges the problem, he is still seen as a hero, suffering for his bad judgment, instead of being send as a stubborn incestuous monster. The dramatic irony in the story only allowed it to become a better play. It keeps the audience in suspense, because they know the truth, and they wish they could just yell out, “Oedipus, it is you, you are the murder! ” It leaves a hint of wanting to help him, and in this way, draws in the reader.