The Effectiveness of Hip Hop in Urban Teacher Education Assignment

The Effectiveness of Hip Hop in Urban Teacher Education Assignment Words: 2190

This study draws from a qualitative study of ten Black male K-12 teachers from the Hip Hop Generation who are closely connected to Hip Hop culture and have been effective in addressing the academic and social needs of Black boys. Through an analysis of their social, educational and cultural experiences, this study highlights two organizing principles drawn from Hip Hop Culture-?(a) Call to Service (b) Resistance to Social Injustice-?which profoundly shaped the teaching Identities of these Black men.

In the study It discusses the Implications of these principles for nationalizing and creating teaching and learning environments that are supportive for Black male teachers and increase the capacity of all teachers to effectively teach diverse student populations. Introduction The purpose of this study Is to conduct an exploratory research class assignment about Hip-hop. The full title of my research is “The Effectiveness of Hip Hop in urban Teacher Education”; I chose this topic because I have observed firsthand how Hip Hop can be used in the classroom.

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Hip Hop has become a major tool to use in urban education, particularly as it pertains to training teachers. The idea of using meeting In popular culture for the sake of support instruction Is not new to teacher education. Nevertheless, the academic challenges urban education especially Black male students has made It a necessity to try and recruit more Black men into the teaching field. The feeling is that Blackman can be a great asset in education and can excel in teaching in diverse student population.

One response to these feelings has been an increasing focus on Hip Hop and its potential in helping to teach diverse students in an urban setting (Stalls, 2006). Since the origin of Hip Hop more than 40 years ago, it has been demonic and modestly In the field of education and In basic US. Society altogether. It has been described as greatly masculine, sexual, and known to influence criminal behavior. It has been said to promote the lack of personal and academic growth and development of urban youth.

Now these are the ideas of the old folks, but Hip Hop has been commodities and sold to young people of all background by the media and entertainment industry, and it has been packaged as an instructional tool for One thing that we can determine as it pertains to teaching and fact would be that’s “it’s a calling”, everyone can’t teach. The statement that teaching is a calling speaks to the heart of the teacher and it address a caring yielding positive socio- emotional outcomes for students of color are motivated by the connection the teacher has towards that student.

It is very much factual that the type of momentum that will be needed to attract and sustain teachers in an urban will require teachers that have teaching as a calling and not Just as a profession. The participants in this study believe that as educators, Black men play a big role in helping Black man youth overcome the challenges they face in urban schools as ell as urban communities. In teaching urban students, it is very important to know that “there is no magical curriculum: there is no magical school building.

The magic is in you, the people” (Bridges, 2009, p. 175) Literature Review 1. Oakum, A. A. (2009). Critical hip hop pedagogy as a form of liberator praxis. Equity & Excellence in Education, 42 (1), 52-66. From Oakum’s article I gain a better understand of what hip-hop really is, and what it means to people. For my methodology its best to understand what hip-hop is before trying to abstract mainstream and alternative as subcultures. Without a basic foundation of understanding on a subject it would hard to build and generate new information to support it.

Oakum’s writings also dwell on teaching with hip-hop from a critical standpoint. Some of the subject terms in the teaching are equality and racism. I find out if these terms also appear in the subcultures of hip-hop, mainly mainstream and alternative hip-hop. 2. Forman, M. (1995). Media from and cultural space: negotiating rap “fanzines”. Journal of Popular Culture, 29 (2), 171-188. Formant’s article in ‘Journal of popular culture’ covers the wealth of rap and hip-hop financially. Forman gives examples of way hip-hop music grosses large sums of money without mainstream acceptance.

The article goes on to talk about how teenagers boast much of the revenue brought in by hip-hop music and paraphernalia, coining the term “a youth culture”. Overall, the article describes rap and hip-hop as being dominate fixtures in the cultural economy. Leaders of this hip-hop cultural influence Forman noted from 1995 are Biz Marie, Heavy D, and Public Enemy. In my opinion the cultural status-crow has changed, and mainstream industries no longer ignores but embraces rap and hip-hop music. . Keno, M. (2000). Under ground: what does it really mean anyway;ay?

Billboard, 112 (14), 38. This article helps me to better understand what separates underground/alternative hip-hop from the so called mainstream. Keno writes that hip-hop was once all an underground genre. Hip-hop gained mainstream popularity when the hip-hop industry started making millions, along with controversial and rebellious groups such as NNW. With input from Chris Schwartz (CEO of Ruff nation) the article points at a new underground that doesn’t always involve the millions of dollars and political controversies.

Keno highlights mainstream as having “more noise and less music” and lacking “traditional hip-hop values”. One aspect of traditional values is being that the artist is more available to his/her listeners through personal appearances and live performances. 4. Marsh, P. K. (2010). Our generation is opening its eyes: hip-hop and youth identity in contemporary Mongolia. Central Asian Survey, 29 (3), 345-358. From Peter Marsh’s reaches. Marsh explains how Mongolia is gaining a new cultural identity through popular music. He states that hip-hop is gaining influence in post-socialistic

Mongolia, but is it mainstream or alternative hip-hop whose long arm reaches half- way across the world to uplift this new Mongolia generation. In the article Marsh gives input from local Mongolia rap artist that tell how hip-hop has inspired them and in return inspired their nation from their “rebellious bad boy’ lyrics. Nevertheless, hip-hop (a form of music that was once smuggled into the country), is now changing the course of the Mongolia politically and socially. Methodology When thinking about the current context of urban education and the national initiative to increase the numbers of Black man teachers in U.

S. Public schools, it is an opportune time for teacher education to capitalize on the relationship between Black men, urban youth, and Hip Hop culture. This study draws from a qualitative study of 25 Black male K-12 teachers from the Hip Hop Generation who are closely connected to the Hip Hop culture. They all have a good success rate when addressing the social and academic needs of Black boys. By using an analysis of their social, educational and cultural experiences, this study highlights two organizing principles drawn from Hip Hop culture.

A call to service, and a resistance to Hip Hop injustice which shapes the teachers identities of these Black men educators (Lynn, 1999). My interest in re-conceptualizing Hip Hop and re-imaging Black men as conduits for reformation in urban teacher education undergrads the fundamental belief in their collective capacities to encourage urban youth to make meaning of, and more unity engage in, their educational Journeys where creating classroom contexts that normalize their orientations towards service to humanity, self-awareness, social justice, and community activism.

Therefore, the two organizing principals of Hip Hop discussed in this art not only frame the pedagogical orientations of the Black male teachers in this study, but they also represent principals that should be used to support the intellectual, social, and personal development of urban youth. Three scholars who Vive referenced in my research are Oakum A, Forman A, and Keno M. From Oakum’s article I gain a better understand of what hip-hop really is, and what it means to people. For my methodology its best to understand what hip-hop is before trying to abstract mainstream and alternative as subcultures.

Without a basic foundation of understanding on a subject it would hard to build and generate new information to support it. Oakum’s writings also dwell on teaching with hip-hop from a critical standpoint. Some of the subject terms in the teaching are equality and racism. I find out if these terms also appear in the subcultures of hip-hop, mainly mainstream and alternative hip-hop. Formant’s article in ‘Journal of popular culture’ covers the wealth of rap and hip-hop financially. Forman gives examples of way hip- hop music grosses large sums of money without mainstream acceptance.

The article goes on to talk about how teenagers boast much of the revenue brought in by hip- hop music and paraphernalia, coining the term “a youth culture”. Overall, the article describes rap and hip-hop as being dominate fixtures in the cultural economy. Leaders of this hip-hop cultural influence Forman noted from 1995 are NNW, Chuck D, and KIRKS-I . In my opinion the cultural status-crow has changed, and mainstream acceptance, an educator can move strategies from Hip Hop into the classroom instruction.

Keno’s article helps me to better understand what separates underground/alternative hip-hop from the so called mainstream. Keno writes that IP-hop was once all an underground genre. Hip-hop gained mainstream popularity when the hip-hop industry started making millions, along with controversial and rebellious groups such as NNW. With input from Chris Schwartz (CEO of Ruff nation) the article points at a new underground that doesn’t always involve the millions of dollars and political controversies. Keno highlights mainstream as having “more noise and less music” and lacking “traditional hip-hop values”.

One aspect of traditional values is being that the artist is more available to his/her listeners through personal appearances and live performances The design that Vive chosen for y research is content analysis because my topic mostly consists of opinion based research from scholars and experts from a specific field or industry. I will not be performing in-depth interviews or surveys because my research deals with the analyzing of music content rather than statistical information. The types of questions that I would utilize in my research are; what are the key differences that separate mainstream hip-hop from alternative.

The only samplings that will be used in my research are the articles that I review that have in-depth research on my topic. Also, to better explain and describe my topic I will utilize audio and video implications for each of the sub-genres in my topic. Expected Conclusion The goal of this study in understanding Hip Hop as grounded in principles services, self-awareness, and sociopolitical resistance, is to humanism, and elevate the experiences and cultural expression of Black men and American boys and throughout the world.

The study sought to analyze Hip Hop as a framework that provides Black youth to engage in critical thinking about their lives. In the study, the voices of the part pants echoed the same thing, that’s its imperative to attract Black en to the teaching profession and to make deeper and more meaningful connection with Black male students. The study gave suggested implication for establishing learning environment that are supportive for Black males teachers, and that in tell will increase the capacity of all teachers to teach effectively in an urban school setting.

The first suggest implication deals with prospective teachers in an urban setting. Teacher’s education must move away from focusing greatly on standardized test scores and college grade point average as a selection criterion for accepting prospective students into teaching programs. Instead there should be a calling for teacher who are deeply invested and closely connected to urban communities. Using test scores only as a recruitment measure, limits the search and give us limited access to those who may be the most affective at teaching urban youth.

The next suggestion implication deals with recruitment of teachers in a school setting. Historically Black college and universities (Hubbubs), community college, and alternative certification programs would provide K-12 schools access to Black men who may have otherwise overlooked teaching as a viable profession. Organization such as Black fraternities and religious conferences attract Black men who may have otherwise overlooked teaching as a money making profession. Help with educating Black male youth.

Same sex classroom, where Black men and boys can truly bond without the other sex to distract. One thing that has been proven overtime and that is boys are heavily influence by the presence of girls. A classroom where Black men engage in traditional curriculum and address the social and personal challenges they faces as a Black youth can be a discussion can can’t be measured in value. Reference Oakum, A. A. (2009). Critical hip hop pedagogy as a form of liberator praxis. Equity & Excellence in Education, 42 (1), 52-66. Boogie Down Productions. (1989).

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